Thursday, October 2, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

The Romanovs in St. Petersburg

History of St. Petersburg Museum

 

  Print this article Print this article

Chris Floyd's Global Eye

Published: September 30, 2003 (Issue # 906)


Feeding Frenzy

Now the mission is accomplished!

George W. Bush's premature projaculation of victory last May notwithstanding, the real objective of the Potomac Empire's invasion of Iraq was finally achieved last weekend, when the sock puppets of the occupying powers put their rubber stamp to an American diktat opening up the entire nation to plunder by foreign bagmen.

At the signed order of Bushist viceroy Paul Bremer (emphasis on vice), almost every aspect of Iraqi life - electricity, water, medicine, education, agriculture, transportation, communications and, above all, banking and finance - was laid open to unfettered exploitation by the plutocrats and lootocrats of the "civilized" world. The lone exception to this unprecedented fire sale of an entire nation is, of course, Iraq's oil wealth, which has already been put into the loving, no-bid, open-ended "oversight" of Dick Cheney's Halliburton and associates.

The measure, announced by surprise last Sunday - not even Bush's so-called "partner" in conquest, the British government, knew about it in advance - permits 100 percent foreign ownership in all non-energy sectors of the conquered land's economy, which will be "privatized" to a fare-thee-well. What's more, the edict allows the "full, immediate remittance to the [investor's] host country of profits, dividends, interest and royalties."

In other words, the looters won't have to plow so much as a dime of their swag back into the local economy; every last cent wrung from the bludgeoned Iraqi people will flow into corporate coffers and private pockets in London, Paris, Tokyo, Riyadh, New York, Moscow, Kennebunkport and Crawford. Taxes will be minimal, tariffs almost non-existent, and there will be none of the pesky rules and regulations that occasionally hamper unfettered corporate gobbling in more unenlightened states - like, say, the United States and Great Britain.

In fact, there will "no government screening" at all of foreign investors, the edict says. If you can pay, you can play. After all, that's free enterprise, isn't it? If Bechtel, Carlyle, Vivendi, or the still-unslain beast of Enron want to buy up Baghdad's water supply and raise rates through the roof, why shouldn't they? If Bush - who just this week issued new regulations opening the federal pork barrel to his favorite "faith-based organizations" - wants to give Pat Robertson a billion dollars of taxpayer money to take over the Iraqi school system, why shouldn't he? What's the point of slaughtering thousands of innocent people and seizing their country if you can't do whatever the hell you want with it? It's not like this was some humanitarian exercise, you know. It's strictly business - as Michael Corleone used to say.

Pages: [1] [2]






 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, Oct. 2


The celebration of the bicentennial of the birth of Mikhail Lermontov continues with todays free exhibition in the citys Lermontov Library at 19 Liteiny Prospekt. Titled Under the Rustling Wings, the temporary exhibition will feature the costumes and scenery used in the 1917 production of Lermontovs play The Masquerade, which he wrote in 1835 when he was only 21 years old.



Friday, Oct. 3


Learn more about how to manage and evaluate employee performance during SPIBAs Human Resources Committee meeting this morning on Employee Assessment: Global and Local Trends. Starting at 9:30 a.m., the discussion will touch on such topics as the partnership between HR and business, reliable assessment strategies and more, with Tatiana Andrianova, the head of the SHL Russia and CIS branch in St. Petersburg, as the featured guest. Confirm your participation by Oct. 2 by emailing office@spiba.ru or calling 325 9091.


AmChams Procurement Committee Meeting is at 9 a.m. this morning in their office in the New St. Isaac Office Center on Ulitsa Yakubovicha.



Saturday, Oct. 4


Wine and cheese lovers will get their chance to revel during Scandinavia Country Club and Spas Wine Market Weekend. Going on today and tomorrow, wining diners can listen to live music, take part in culinary classes and, of course, sample a variety of fine wines from around the world. The cost of admission is 400 rubles ($10.30) for adults and 200 rubles ($5.15) for children.



Sunday, Oct. 5


Look for the latest fall fashions at the Autumn Market today in Freedom Anticafe at 7 Kazanskaya Ulitsa. The minimarket plans to offer clothes more flattering than the puffy jackets that are a staple of the citys cold-weather fashion, while offering the same amount of protection from the biting winds blowing off of the Baltic.



Monday, Oct. 6


SKA St. Petersburg, the citys KHL affiliate, welcomes Slovakian club HC Slovan in a match-up tonight at the Ice Palace near the Prospekt Bolshevikov metro station. The puck drops at 7:30 p.m. and tickets can be purchased on the clubs website or in person at either the arenas box office or the clubs merchandise store on Nevsky Prospekt.



Tuesday, Oct. 7


Learn more about Russias energy industry at the St. Petersburg Energy Forum that begins today and runs through Oct. 10. Attracting industry experts and political and business representatives, the forum plans to welcome more than 350 plus companies and their representatives to discuss the future of Russias largest economic sector.



Times Talk