Friday, August 22, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

The Romanovs in St. Petersburg

History of St. Petersburg Museum

Small Tragedy, Fatal Passion

Rimsky-Korsakov Apartment Museum

 

  Print this article Print this article

Chris Floyd's Global Eye

Published: September 30, 2003 (Issue # 906)


Feeding Frenzy

Now the mission is accomplished!

George W. Bush's premature projaculation of victory last May notwithstanding, the real objective of the Potomac Empire's invasion of Iraq was finally achieved last weekend, when the sock puppets of the occupying powers put their rubber stamp to an American diktat opening up the entire nation to plunder by foreign bagmen.

At the signed order of Bushist viceroy Paul Bremer (emphasis on vice), almost every aspect of Iraqi life - electricity, water, medicine, education, agriculture, transportation, communications and, above all, banking and finance - was laid open to unfettered exploitation by the plutocrats and lootocrats of the "civilized" world. The lone exception to this unprecedented fire sale of an entire nation is, of course, Iraq's oil wealth, which has already been put into the loving, no-bid, open-ended "oversight" of Dick Cheney's Halliburton and associates.

The measure, announced by surprise last Sunday - not even Bush's so-called "partner" in conquest, the British government, knew about it in advance - permits 100 percent foreign ownership in all non-energy sectors of the conquered land's economy, which will be "privatized" to a fare-thee-well. What's more, the edict allows the "full, immediate remittance to the [investor's] host country of profits, dividends, interest and royalties."

In other words, the looters won't have to plow so much as a dime of their swag back into the local economy; every last cent wrung from the bludgeoned Iraqi people will flow into corporate coffers and private pockets in London, Paris, Tokyo, Riyadh, New York, Moscow, Kennebunkport and Crawford. Taxes will be minimal, tariffs almost non-existent, and there will be none of the pesky rules and regulations that occasionally hamper unfettered corporate gobbling in more unenlightened states - like, say, the United States and Great Britain.

In fact, there will "no government screening" at all of foreign investors, the edict says. If you can pay, you can play. After all, that's free enterprise, isn't it? If Bechtel, Carlyle, Vivendi, or the still-unslain beast of Enron want to buy up Baghdad's water supply and raise rates through the roof, why shouldn't they? If Bush - who just this week issued new regulations opening the federal pork barrel to his favorite "faith-based organizations" - wants to give Pat Robertson a billion dollars of taxpayer money to take over the Iraqi school system, why shouldn't he? What's the point of slaughtering thousands of innocent people and seizing their country if you can't do whatever the hell you want with it? It's not like this was some humanitarian exercise, you know. It's strictly business - as Michael Corleone used to say.

Pages: [1] [2]






 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Aug. 22


Get ready to pledge allegiance to the flag during National Flag Day, paying tribute to when, 23 years ago today, the iconic hammer-and-sickle was replaced with the tricolor that now flutters in the wind. Petersburgers will be treated to a free concert on Palace Square, a military parade and a culminating air show featuring Russias Russian Knights stunt pilots.



Saturday, Aug. 23


Uppsala Park plays host to Fairy Noon today, a performance of five separate fairy tales ranging from folk classics to more haunting selections. There will be three different renditions of the tales throughout the day and tickets start at 500 rubles ($13.80) for adults and 300 rubles ($8.30) for children.


Classic Finnish cartoon characters the Moomins expect to receive a warm welcome from Russian fans during todays Moomin Festival at the Pearl Plaza Shopping Center at 51 Petergofskoye Shosse. Become a kid again or introduce a new generation to the beloved creation of Finnish writer Tove Jansson.



Sunday, Aug. 24


The tortured genius of Dutch master Vincent van Gogh gets his day in the centers Konnushnaya Ploschad during Make Art Like Van Gogh, a daylong celebration of the artist that will allow amateur artists to try and replicate the work that made the famed painter world-renowned.


Experience a variety of dances highlighting the diversity of the world around as at the final day of the Ethno-Dance International Dance Festival that has been at the St. Petersburg Humanitarian University of Trade Unions this past week. Tonights performance will feature Egyptian dancers accompanied by local orchestras.



Monday, Aug. 25


Today kicks off the Elena Obraztsovoy International Competition for Young Vocalists in the large hall of the Shostakovich Philharmonic. Talented youngsters will showcase their range over the next six days before a winner is chosen on Aug. 30.



Tuesday, Aug. 26


Love movies but hate all those words? Then check out Rodina Cinema Centers Factor of Consensus film forum this evening. Silent movie classics from the beginning of the 20th century will be screened and accompanied by a pianist, who will provide the soundtrack for the ongoing action. The screenings begin at 7 p.m. Check Rodinas website for more details.



Times Talk