Saturday, November 1, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS Download APP
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

19th Century Portraits

History of St. Petersburg Museum: Rumyantsev Mansion

 

  Print this article Print this article

Orange revolution

Published: March 9, 2007 (Issue # 1252)



  • Alain Maratrat (l) directs performers at a rehearsal of his production of The Love For Three Oranges at the Mariinsky Theater this week.
    Photo: For The St. Petersburg Times

Alain Maratrat aims to awaken opera fans joi de vivre in his production of Sergei Prokofievs The Love For Three Oranges which premieres on Wednesday at the Mariinsky Theater.

Inspired by Carlo Gozzis commedia dellarte scenario, the surrealistic and enchanting work is Prokofievs most widely performed opera. The Gozzi tale was admired by the composer for its bright theatricality and a whimsical fusion of magic and parody.

When I left Moscow, I took a volume of plays with me for the journey; in it was printed Carlo Gozzis The Love For Three Oranges, Prokofiev wrote in his diary. It held me spellbound with its mix of fairy tales, humor and satire it was during that long journey that I began something resembling a sketch for the opera.

The Love For Three Oranges tells the story of a hypochondriac prince who falls in love with a princess from a distance. The prince is looking for a place for himself and is rewarded by the love of the princess. The opera is packed with miracles, parodies and mystifications.

The opera first saw the stage in Chicago on Dec. 30, 1921, and immediately became a favorite on the international opera scene. It enjoyed its first staging at the Mariinsky five years later. Prokofiev welcomed the Russian premiere staged by director Sergei Radlov by saying that the show was by far the most successful production of the opera he had seen. Mariinskys second take on the opera, directed by Alexander Petrov, followed in 1991.

This work is like a bustling musical show, with a lot of drive and passion, Maratrat, the French director of the latest version, said, exuding enthusiasm and promising a dynamic production with snappy changes of set. And this is a fantastic story.

Maratrat is hoping to inspire and encourage a more cheerful and more curious attitude in the audiences. The hypochondriac prince has become a common type these days, the director feels.

There are so many young people who do exactly the same shutting themselves off from the real world, hiding from reality on the internet, and being afraid of life itself, Maratrat said. They need a way out of that trap, and the story of the poor prince shows one such way. We need to make it believable.

I do feel I need to whet peoples appetite for life, Maratrat told The St. Petersburg Times in an interview between rehearsals on Tuesday. Look around, and you see that even young people have a meagre appetite for life; dull, uninspired faces abound the streets, regardless of where you go. People just do not smile anymore.

Pages: [1] [2]






 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Saturday, Nov. 1


The men and women who dedicate their lives to fitness get their chance to compete for the title of best body in Russia at todays Grand Prix Fitness House PRO, the nations premier bodybuilding competition. Not only will men and women be competing for thousands of dollars in prizes and a trip to represent their nation at Mr. Olympia but sporting goods and nutritional supplements will also be available for sale. Learn more about the culture of the Indian subcontinent during Diwali, the annual festival of lights that will be celebrated in St. Petersburg this weekend at the Culture Palace on Tambovskaya Ul. For 100 rubles ($2.40), festival-goers listen to Indian music, try on traditional Indian outfits and sample dishes highlighting the culinary diversity of the billion-plus people in the South Asian superpower.



Sunday, Nov. 2


Check out the latest video and interactive games at the Gaming Festival at the Mayakovsky Library ending today. Meet with the developers of the popular and learn more about their work, or learn how to play one of their creations with the opportunity to ask the creators themselves about the exact rules.



Monday, Nov. 3


Non-athletes can get feed their need for competition without breaking a sweat at the Rock-Paper-Scissors tournament this evening at the Cube Bar at Lomonosova 1. Referees will judge the validity of each matchup award points to winners while the citys elite fight for the chance to be called the best of the best. Those hoping to play must arrange a team beforehand and pay 200 rubles ($4.80) to enter.



Tuesday, Nov. 4


Attend the premiere of Canadian director Xavier Dolans latest film Mommy at the Avrora theater this evening. The fifth picture from the 25-year-old, it is the story of an unruly teenager but the most alluring (or unappealing) aspect is the way the film was shot: in a 1:1 format that is more reminiscent of Instagram videos than cinematic art. Tickets cost 400 rubles ($9.60) and snacks and drinks will be available.



Times Talk