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Spanish Furore Poses Mighty Test for Bosco

Published: August 1, 2012 (Issue # 1720)



  • Spanish canoer Saul Craviotto 
    Photo: courtesy of saul craviotto

  • Members of the 2012 Ukrainian Olympic team dressed in Bosco-designed apparel.
    Photo: nsc-olimpiyskiy.com.ua

MOSCOW As Spains leading athletes go in and out of the Olympic Village in east London during this summers games, they probably have a whole raft of questions on their minds. When do I have to show up for qualifying heats? How many more practices should I fit in? And why, Dios mio, do I have to wear this uniform?

Russian sportswear company Bosco Sport dressed the Spanish Olympic team for free this summer, and both the company and its Olympic outfits have been receiving tons of coverage in media outlets worldwide though it might not be the publicity that the company had hoped for.

The subject of astonishment and ridicule, the Spanish kit ranges from the old-timey yellow jackets and long red skirts worn by its female athletes during Fridays opening ceremony, to competition wear in a never-before-seen mix of cherry red, orange and canary yellow.

When the newspaper El Pais gave the Spanish public its first glances of the Bosco Sport uniforms, one reader said on the Spanish papers website that the warm-up suit looked like a costume for a lion tamer.

Its best if I dont comment. Leaving that to others, Spanish Olympian Saul Craviotto wrote on Twitter to caption a photograph of himself trying on his uniform at home this month. In the picture, the handsome sprint canoer wears a look of pained disbelief underneath a sports cap with an orange-red crown, a yellow visor and red embroidery resembling turkey feet.

He models bright red pants and a polo shirt covered with horseshoe-crab-shaped orange-red motifs. A yellow and red knapsack rounds out the outfit.

He was one of a handful of Spanish Olympic participants who have commented publicly on their dislike of the uniforms. Field hockey champion Alex Fabregas tweeted out a mock-enthusiastic photo of himself in uniform, saying, There are no adjectives.

For Bosco Sport, part of Russian fashion importer and retailer Bosco di Ciliegi, the Summer Olympics outfits arent just about what fans think as they watch a handful of matches from the stands or at home. Rather, the companys long-term international expansion goals hinge in part on the impression of Bosco Sport formed during the games.

The founder of Bosco di Ciliegi, a company whose name is an Italian translation of cherry orchard, was skeptical of the negative reaction.

Spanish people will be at the cash tills to buy our clothes, Mikhail Kusnirovich told Bloomberg News. I understand that for some Spanish fans they are unusual designs, but we have to be recognized very fast you only have a few seconds on TV.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Sunday, Oct. 26


Zenit St. Petersburg returns home for the first time in nearly a month as they host Mordovia Saransk in a Russian Premier League game. Currently at the top of the league thanks to their undefeated start to the season, the northern club hopes to extend the gap between them and second-place CSKA Moscow and win the title for the first time in three years. Tickets are available at the stadium box office or on the clubs website.



Monday, Oct. 27


Today marks the end of the art exhibit Neophobia at the Erarta Museum. Artists Alexey Semichov and Andrei Kuzmin took a neo-modernist approach to represent the array of fears that are ever-present throughout our lives. Tickets are 200 rubles ($4.90).



Tuesday, Oct. 28


The Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel plays host to SPIBAs Marketing and Communications Committees round table discussion on Government Relations Practices in Russia this morning. The discussion starts at 9:30 a.m. and participation must be confirmed by Oct. 24.



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