Sunday, October 26, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS Download APP
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

19th Century Portraits

History of St. Petersburg Museum: Rumyantsev Mansion

 

Перевести на русский Перевести на русский Print this article Print this article

Cyprus Crisis Sees Russian Investors Flee to Virgin Islands

Published: August 19, 2013 (Issue # 1773)



  • Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands.
    Photo: Wikimedia Commons

President Vladimir Putin's calls for domestic companies to repatriate their funds back home from offshore jurisdictions have fallen on deaf ears, with almost half of the $67 billion investment by Russian residents abroad in the first quarter of this year settling in the British Virgin Islands, according to figures released by the Central Bank on Friday.

The British Virgin Islands saw $31.66 billion of direct investment by Russian residents during the first three months of 2013 in the wake of the banking crisis in Cyprus — previously Russians' favorite tax haven. The figure skyrocketed from just $2.1 billion in the first quarter of 2012 and $4 billion during the fourth quarter of last year.

The investments accounted for 47 percent of the $67.2 billion that Russian residents invested outside the country in January through March.

The second largest investment was made in Luxembourg and accounted for $13.9 billion, up from $258 million in the first quarter of 2012 and $1.8 billion during the last three months of last year. Cyprus saw a modest $2.7 billion, down from $4.8 billion in the same period a year earlier, the Central Bank data showed.

"The figures are, apparently linked to the financial problems in Cyprus," said Alexei Devyatov, chief economist at UralSib Capital.

He suggested that, although the Cypriot crisis broke out only in March, many investors had expected problems, and this resulted in redistribution of capital flows between offshore centers in the first quarter of the year.

It might take Cyprus a few years to win back depositors' trust, Devyatov said.

The collapse of the Cypriot banking system earlier this year left the accounts of many Russian companies and individual depositors frozen, followed by a restructuring of the Bank of Cyprus and plans to liquidate Cyprus Popular Bank, also known as Laiki.

The move was part of the bailout plan approved by the Cypriot government and its European Union creditors that also envisaged that the island country's authorities would slash part of the deposits in the Bank of Cyprus exceeding 100,000 euros to recapitalize the lender. The bank's clients falling under this category will lose 47.5 percent of their savings, Reuters reported earlier this month.

Pages: [1] [2]






 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Sunday, Oct. 26


Zenit St. Petersburg returns home for the first time in nearly a month as they host Mordovia Saransk in a Russian Premier League game. Currently at the top of the league thanks to their undefeated start to the season, the northern club hopes to extend the gap between them and second-place CSKA Moscow and win the title for the first time in three years. Tickets are available at the stadium box office or on the club’s website.



Monday, Oct. 27


Today marks the end of the art exhibit “Neophobia” at the Erarta Museum. Artists Alexey Semichov and Andrei Kuzmin took a neo-modernist approach to represent the array of fears that are ever-present throughout our lives. Tickets are 200 rubles ($4.90).



Tuesday, Oct. 28


The Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel plays host to SPIBA’s Marketing and Communications Committee’s round table discussion on “Government Relations Practices in Russia” this morning. The discussion starts at 9:30 a.m. and participation must be confirmed by Oct. 24.



Times Talk