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Choosing the Best Nutcracker

Published: January 1, 2014 (Issue # 1792)



  • Mikhail Shemyakins gothic-tinged version of The Nutcracker is popular with young and old alike.
    Photo: Natasha Razina / For SPT

  • The traditional performance by Vasily Vainonen is danced by students from the Vaganova Academy.
    Photo: V. Baranovsky / For SPT

Just as nature has its seasons, so do the arts. In Russia, the wintry period spanning the Western and Orthodox Christmas is known as Nutcracker Season and justly so.

Inspired by the E. T. A. Hoffmann story The Nutcracker and the Mouse King, the famed ballet tells a magical love story that develops around Christmas between a poetically-inclined girl and a scary-looking Nutcracker who goes to battle with the dangerous Mouse King. The Hoffmann novella appealed to Marius Petipa, the French choreographer who in the late-19th century defined Russian classical ballet. In 1891, Petipa commissioned composer Pyotr Tchaikovsky to create a score for a show based on the tale and the story of The Nutcracker, a title synonymous with Russian classical ballet, began.

For more than a century, Hoffmanns has reigned supreme on Russian stages every December.

Indeed, December is usually the most exciting and most challenging month at the Vaganova Ballet Academy as the best students have earned a chance to perform on the stage of the Mariinsky Theater in The Nutcracker during the Christmas and the New Year holidays. In the darkest and often the coldest weeks of the year, rehearsals go full steam ahead in the Academys spacious and slightly chilly studios.

Everyone at the school is always excited about The Nutcracker, and it is different every year because the school has a constant flow of new talent making the ballet their own. These shows almost always bring surprises, with the students displaying talent that neither their ballet masters nor the dancers themselves would ever expect.

Tchaikovskys Nutcracker is one of the most beautiful pieces of ballet music ever written yet it has proved a tough nut for quite a few choreographers. For starters, ballet legend Petipa simply gave up and left the work to Lev Ivanov in 1892. His more courageous descendants, including Vasily Vainonen, Fyodor Lopukhov and Maurice Bejart, all had a go at staging the ballet.

Vainonens version an adaptation of Ivanovs work is the one performed by the majority of Russian companies, including the Vaganova performances at the Mariinsky and the shows of the Russian Ballet Theater, a dance company that performs the ballet at the Hermitage Theater.

However, the Mikhailovsky Theater, which rivals the Mariinsky as another former Imperial ballet theater, prefers a newer version credited to the contemporary St. Petersburg choreographer Nikolai Boyarchikov. While rooted in the traditions forged by Petipa, Boyarchikovs work has its own choreographic language that appeals to the human soul and emphasizes the spiritual. Boyarchikov is an intellectual choreographer who thrives on metaphors and associations, while refraining from exploiting clichés. There is always a humane message in his ballets and in his version of The Nutcracker, it is the simple truth that kindness turns an individual into a human being.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, July 23


SPIBAs Legislation & Lobbying Committee invites everyone interested in the practical aspects of courts and procedural law to todays Legal Debating Club at 9:30 a.m. at the Mertens House, 21 Nevsky Prospekt, office 506. Visit spiba.ru for more details.


Take advantage of the sunny summer days and participate in Beach Games 2014, which runs through July 27 in Sestroretsks Dubki Park.



Thursday, July 24


Liliana Modiliani, a well-known Russian stylist, will talk about choosing clothes that fit during her lecture at 7 p.m. at the Pryamoy Efir art club, 13 Viborgskoe Shosse.



Friday, July 25


Discuss Russias economic and political prospects for 2014 during a Business Breakfast organized by SPIBA at 9.30 a.m. in the Bank Saint-Petersburg office at 64


Malookhtinsky Prospekt.


Start your weekend with adorable miniature pigs at the Squealing Pig festival at 7 p.m. this evening in the Karl & Friedrich restaurant, 15 Iozhnaya doroga, on Krestovsky Island.



Saturday, July 26


Hundreds of brand-new and retro cars, drag and drift shows, test drives and karting are planned for the Avtobum-2014 festival, which will take place in front of the RIO shopping center at 2 Fuchika Ulitsa.


Participants in todays SaniDay Summer competition will impress visitors with their hand-made, unusual and hilarious boats, which will race at the Igora Resort near the 54th kilometer on Priozerskoe Shosse.


Metro Family Day will include both serious lectures for adults and master-classes for children, making the event interesting for the whole family. To participate, come to Kirov Park on Yelagin Island.


Photography will be the focus of todays Photosubbota, which features lectures by famous photographers, meetings with photo schools and studio representatives, and participation in a photography competition. The event starts at noon at Petrokongress, 5 Lodeynopolskaya Ulitsa.


If you like cycling, make sure to visit the Za Velogorod Festival with its retro bike exhibition, market and live music. The second round of the Leningrad Criterium race will also take place during the event at Petrovsky Arsenal in Sestroretsk.



Sunday, July 27


Navy Day will be celebrated with a weapon and military transportation exhibition, self-defense master classes and concerts. The event starts at 1 p.m. in the 300th Anniversary Park of St. Petersburg.



Monday, July 28


Dont miss a chance to see the latest achievements in robotics during the RoboDom interactive show, exhibiting more than 150 robots. The show will be at BUM center, 22/2 Gzhatskaya Ulitsa, until Aug. 3. The entrance ticket costs 350 rubles ($10).



Tuesday, July 29


A video of a Queen concert from 1986 will be shown today at 8 p.m. in Yaschik, 50/13 Ligovsky Prospekt.



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