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a man without a country

Published: September 27, 2002 (Issue # 807)


A few words like "mizzle," "tubernose," "nuncle" and "minikin" soon warn the reader here that "Nowhere Man" is no ordinary book. The author has come to the United States very recently from what I guess we would still call the former Yugoslavia, and he has already been compared, in linguistic terms, to Nabokov and Conrad.

It might be better to look at "Nowhere Man" more simply as a novel, without the decorative wordplay. Aleksandar Hemon has created a fictional alter ego, a fellow named Pronek, born into Marshal Tito's made-up country, a sweet place of summer resorts "where pines gave off bounteous resin smells, when the breeze of the sea brought forth tickling sultriness, when warm bodies exuded coconut-milky sun-lotion scent." And the Bosnian capital, still poignantly untouched and alive: "They heard a hum, a gigantic hum, like the Big Bang echo. It was the sum of all the life noises Sarajevo produced, his father said: the clattering of dishwashers and buses; the music from bars and radios; the bawling of spoiled children, doors slamming: engines running." Altogether an enchanted country, a place that the reader knows - with an all-too-sickening feeling - is headed inexorably for historical disaster, chaotic civil war.

But, growing up, Pronek doesn't know. He's just a kid, meeting another kid - Mirza, who will remain his lifelong friend - the first day of kindergarten, waking up one night to find his beloved grandma dead, growing into puberty, falling in love with the Beatles, purchasing his first guitar, spending long afternoons in a series of bad garage bands, writing a slew of embarrassing songs, going on dates and finally getting lucky.

There's no way to prepare for the future if we don't know it's coming. Pronek can only grow up and live his life. He's conscripted into the army, hates it, gets out. He's part of a delegation to the Soviet Union, where he enthralls other foreign students by talking trash to the listening devices installed in every room. He takes vacations with his parents and is mildly revolted by the fact that they still want to have sex. In other words, Pronek is just a guy. But he's worth noticing, worth falling in love with, even, because he's human.

Then, the war. By a fluke, Pronek finds himself in the United States. His best friend, Mirza, remains home, caught in a ghastly nightmare: "One time I was with my friend Jasmin," Mirza writes, "and we are talking ... and one second later his head explodes like pomegranate. That second when I see it but I cannot say nothing, because the death is very fast, that second is the worst second of my life." Then Mirza goes on to tell the story of a horse who's looked at this nightmare world and had enough: At a clifftop military camp, "the horse goes slowly to the edge, we think he wants some grass there ... . He turns around, looks at us directly in our eyes, like person, big, wet eyes and then just jumps - hop! He just jumps and we can hear remote echo of his body hitting stones. I never saw anything so much sad."

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, Aug. 20


AmCham gets back to business after a summer hiatus with todays EHS Committee Working Group Meeting. Check their website for more details.



Thursday, Aug. 21


Time is running out to see the fantastic creations on display at the 2014 Sand Castle Festival on the beach at the Peter and Paul Fortress. Adhering to the theme of Treasure Island, visitors can wander amongst larger-than-life interpretations of pirate life or attend one of the workshops held to educate a future generation of sand artists. The castles will remain on the beach until Aug. 31.



Friday, Aug. 22


Get ready to pledge allegiance to the flag during National Flag Day, paying tribute to when, 23 years ago today, the iconic hammer-and-sickle was replaced with the tricolor that now flutters in the wind. Petersburgers will be treated to a free concert on Palace Square, a military parade and a culminating air show featuring Russias Russian Knights stunt pilots.



Saturday, Aug. 23


Uppsala Park plays host to Fairy Noon today, a performance of five separate fairy tales ranging from folk classics to more haunting selections. There will be three different renditions of the tales throughout the day and tickets start at 500 rubles ($13.80) for adults and 300 rubles ($8.30) for children.


Classic Finnish cartoon characters the Moomins expect to receive a warm welcome from Russian fans during todays Moomin Festival at the Pearl Plaza Shopping Center at 51 Petergofskoye Shosse. Become a kid again or introduce a new generation to the beloved creation of Finnish writer Tove Jansson.



Sunday, Aug. 24


The tortured genius of Dutch master Vincent van Gogh gets his day in the centers Konnushnaya Ploschad during Make Art Like Van Gogh, a daylong celebration of the artist that will allow amateur artists to try and replicate the work that made the famed painter world-renowned.


Experience a variety of dances highlighting the diversity of the world around as at the final day of the Ethno-Dance International Dance Festival that has been at the St. Petersburg Humanitarian University of Trade Unions this past week. Tonights performance will feature Egyptian dancers accompanied by local orchestras.



Monday, Aug. 25


Today kicks off the Elena Obraztsovoy International Competition for Young Vocalists in the large hall of the Shostakovich Philharmonic. Talented youngsters will showcase their range over the next six days before a winner is chosen on Aug. 30.



Tuesday, Aug. 26


Love movies but hate all those words? Then check out Rodina Cinema Centers Factor of Consensus film forum this evening. Silent movie classics from the beginning of the 20th century will be screened and accompanied by a pianist, who will provide the soundtrack for the ongoing action. The screenings begin at 7 p.m. Check Rodinas website for more details.



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