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St. Petersburg Bans Dog Hunter Sites

Published: January 13, 2014 (Issue # 1792)



  • An estimated 1 million strays roam the streets across Russia.
    Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Russian Internet censorship was broadened this week to include animal protection as two “dog hunter” websites were banned in St. Petersburg.

Russia has a thriving underground community of vigilantes who kill off arguably dangerous stray dogs in areas where animal control measures are ineffective. An estimated 1 million strays roam the streets nationally and people have been wounded and even killed in attacks by hungry dogs.

The court ban was imposed at the request of city prosecutors, who said on their website that the sites violate Russian laws on information, the animal world and protection of minors.

The move may spell a change in Russia’s approach to dog hunters, none of whom have so far been found guilty of animal abuse. The country’s animal rights legislation only criminalizes animal abuse committed out of hooliganism, for profit or in front of minors.

Meanwhile, dog hunters claim to be doing the government’s job in protecting the public. Some 16,600 people were attacked in Moscow alone by stray animals in 2008, the last year for which statistics are available, according to the city branch of the Federal Consumer Protection Service.

Russia was not known before for blacklisting websites accused of animal abuse. The country already censors online “extremist” content, pirated films and websites deemed to promote suicide, illegal drugs and child pornography.

The list of topics subjected to online censorship is increasing, with promotion of unauthorized rallies added in late December.

See also:

Internet Censorship Is Getting Worse

Child-Safe Internet Plan Sparks Censorship Fears





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Oct. 24


SPIBA’s ongoing “Breakfast with the Director” series continues today, featuring Tomas Hajek, Managing Director of the Northwest Division at Danone Russia. Hajek will be discussing collaborations between businesses from different cultures. The meeting is at 9 a.m. at the Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel and all who wish to attend must confirm their participation by Oct. 23.


Get your gong on at “Sounds of the Universe,” a concert at the city planetarium this evening incorporating six different gongs to create relaxing songs that will transport you upwards into the stratosphere. Tickets are 700 rubles ($17).



Saturday, Oct. 25


AVA Expo, the eighth edition of the event revolving around all things pop culture, returns to Lenexpo this weekend. Geeks, nerds, dweebs and dorks will have their chance to talk science fiction and explore a variety of international pop culture. Tickets for the event can be purchased on their website at avaexpo.ru.



Sunday, Oct. 26


Zenit St. Petersburg returns home for the first time in nearly a month as they host Mordovia Saransk in a Russian Premier League game. Currently at the top of the league thanks to their undefeated start to the season, the northern club hopes to extend the gap between them and second-place CSKA Moscow and win the title for the first time in three years. Tickets are available at the stadium box office or on the club’s website.



Monday, Oct. 27


Today marks the end of the art exhibit “Neophobia” at the Erarta Museum. Artists Alexey Semichov and Andrei Kuzmin took a neo-modernist approach to represent the array of fears that are ever-present throughout our lives. Tickets are 200 rubles ($4.90).



Tuesday, Oct. 28


The Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel plays host to SPIBA’s Marketing and Communications Committee’s round table discussion on “Government Relations Practices in Russia” this morning. The discussion starts at 9:30 a.m. and participation must be confirmed by Oct. 24.



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