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St. Pete Jazz Scene Mourns Loss of Pioneer

Published: January 16, 2014 (Issue # 1793)



  • Natan Leites carries an American flag at Pulkovo Airport to welcome jazz musician Wynton Marsalis to St. Petersburg in 1999.
    Photo: for SPT

Jazz promoter Natan Leites, who was a fixture on the Leningrad and St. Petersburg jazz scene for more than 50 years, died at the age of 76 on Dec. 30, 2013. He was cremated on Jan. 5.

For nearly 50 years, Leites headed the Kvadrat Jazz Club, Russias oldest surviving jazz association, which organized concerts and festivals, produced albums, held lectures and published a typewritten magazine containing information about jazz music at a time when it was officially discouraged by the Soviet state.

A true jazz aficionado, Leites was at the center of everything that happened on the local scene, inspiring and educating generations of musicians.

I first came across something resembling jazz music at the Mayak Club on Krasnaya (now Galernaya) Ulitsa, Leites said in an interview with The St. Petersburg Times in 1997. They played music there starting from the Stalin era at some dance nights and stuff.

The trendiest and best-known was a band led by [Izrail] Atlas. Generally, people danced a lot after the war, in the 1950s and the early and mid-1960s. It became a growth medium for so-called Leftfield ensembles. I heard something of the kind for the first time in around 1952.

I became acquainted with [genuine] jazz in the late 1950s; I thought it was good music, I liked it even if it had been terribly abused [by the Soviet authorities] since the early 1950s, especially after [Viktor] Gorodinskys book called Music of Spiritual Poverty, which came out in 1951.

The conversation took place at Leites small apartment in the only Khrushchev-style building on Kazanskaya Ulitsa, which was packed with all sorts of audio equipment, records, tapes, books, magazines and manuscripts.

According to Leites, he was not a political dissident, being first and foremost attracted to the music, rather than to its political overtones.

I was quite a red or pink person at least I believed in socialism, he said.

Too many now say that they opened their eyes awfully early. It couldnt be so. The whole country was in a kind of jar. Only diplomats went abroad, no-one else.

In school you were taught that the steam-engine was invented by the [Russian engineers] Cherepanovs, that all things were done by Soviets or Russians, that we lived better than anyone, because we had no unemployment. We saw nothing.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, Sept. 18


Get your nerd on at Boomfest, St. Petersburgs answer to the United States popular ComicCon. Starting today, this international festival of comics will take over venues throughout the city center and includes exhibitions of comics and illustrations, film screenings, competitions and the chance to meet the genres authors, artists and experts.



Friday, Sept. 19


SPIBAs newest addition to their Cultural Discoveries events is Handmade in Germany, an exhibition featuring unique handmade objects of a significantly higher quality than mass-produced items. The work of over 100 German manufacturers will be displayed during the event, which opens today in the Lutheran Church of Saint Peter and Paul on Nevsky Prospekt and runs through Sept. 28.



Saturday, Sept. 20


Starting on Sept. 18 and ending tomorrow is the Extreme Fantasy Wakeboarding Festival in Sunpark by Sredny Suzdalskoye lake in the Ozerki region of the city.


Those after something more laid back can instead head to Jazz and Wine night at TerraVino with legendary jazz guitarist Ildar Kazahanov. 12/14 Admiralteyskaya Emb.



Sunday, Sept. 21


Learn more about African culture and get some exercise during todays Djembe and Vuvuzela, a bike ride starting in Palace Square that includes several stops where riders can listen to the music of Africa or watch short films about the continent. The riders plan to set off at 4 p.m. and all you need to join is a set of wheels.



Monday, Sept. 22


Do you love puppetry? If so, then be sure to go to BTK-Fest, a five-day festival that starts on Sept. 19 celebrating the art. Contemporaries from France, Belgium, the U.K. and other countries will join Russian artists to put on theatrical performances involving a variety of themes, materials and eras. Workshops and meetings are also scheduled for a chance to discuss the artistic medium in further depth.



Tuesday, Sept. 23


Marina Suhih, Director of the External Communications Department at Rostelecom North-West, and Yana Donskaya, HR Director for Northern Capital Gateway are just some of the confirmed participants of todays round table discussion on Interaction with Trade Unions being hosted by SPIBA. Confirm your attendance with SPIBA by Sept. 22.


Kino Expo 2014, an international film industry convention, will be at LenExpo from today until Sept. 26. The third largest exhibition of film equipment in the world, the expo focuses on not only Russia but former Soviet republics as well.



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