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My Resolutions for 2014

Published: January 17, 2014 (Issue # 1793)


Зарок: pledge, vow.

Every year, like millions of my compatriots, I make New Year's resolutions, and every year, like millions of my compatriots, I fail to achieve them. But I'm never the least bit disconcerted to write "lose weight and get fit" for the 35th year in a row. If you want a textbook example of belief over reason, check out my annual resolution list.

New Year's resolutions are largely an American thing. Russians don't make them. I think this is because personal agency — the ability to achieve what one sets out to achieve — has been problematic in Russia for the last millennium or so: Tatars, tsars, wars and general secretaries got in the way. But also because Russians, by and large, don't buy into the whole "I can reinvent myself" belief that is the basis of American culture.

And so, resolutions defy graceful translation. They might be called новогодние обещания (New Year's promises); обещания, данные самому себе (promises to oneself); цели, поставленные на новый год (goals set for the new year); or the rather lofty sounding новогодние зароки (New Year's pledges). That said, my local fitness club was packed on a weekday afternoon, and the attendant said: Ждите месяц. Рассосётся. (Wait a month. The crowds will thin out.) From this I infer: Resolutions may be nation-­specific, but marketing is universal.

In any case, here are some of my linguistic and lifestyle resolutions for 2014.

1. Вид (aspect). Yes, I know I've resolved to master the intricacies of verbal aspect before, but this time I'm serious. I'm starting with я не могу тебя забыть (I can't — imperfective — forget you — perfective) and я не смогу тебя забыть (I will not — perfective — forget you — perfective). So far I've asked 10 native speakers about the differences between these two sentences and why you can't use забывать (imperfective) and gotten 10 different answers. When I get a consensus, I'll let you know.

2. Ударение (stress). Ditto all of the above, except the 10 Russians I asked about stress in words not only have no idea why they place the stress where they do. They don't even put it on the same syllable. I'm going to concentrate on words like сковорода (skillet, stress on last syllable), which is сковороды (stress on first syllable) in the plural. I see the point of this — the shifting stress tells you if one or many skillets are under discussion — although achieving it is another matter. But I'm optimistic. After all, I'm going to lose weight and get fit this year, too.

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Tuesday, Sept. 30


Local neo-pagans invite all worshipers to the dedication of a new Heart Tree in Sosnovka Park, Gods’ Wood. 4 p.m.


The second MIFIC Expo begins today at Lenexpo, providing an interactive platform for industry experts and manufacturers. Accessories, surfaces and interior decoration materials are just some of the things that will be available for perusal at the expo, which runs through Oct. 2.



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