Wednesday, September 3, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

The Romanovs in St. Petersburg

History of St. Petersburg Museum

Small Tragedy, Fatal Passion

Rimsky-Korsakov Apartment Museum

 

  Print this article Print this article

City Remembers Siege of Leningrad

Published: January 26, 2014 (Issue # 1794)



  • City residents cleaning a street during the first winter in the besieged city.
    Photo: Vsevolod Tarasevich / Wikimedia Commons

  • The corner of Ulitsa Mayakovskaya and Nevsky Prospekt during the blockade.
    Photo: Boris Kudoyarov / Wikimedia Commons

  • Three men burying victims of the siege at the Volkovo cemetery.
    Photo: Boris Kudoyarov / Wikimedia Commons

In fall of 1941, Antonina Vetikova, who was then 14 years old, stopped stammering a problem that she had suffered since early childhood. Ironically, Vetikova was cured of her speech impediment due to the fear she experienced during an air raid on the peaceful residents of a village outside Leningrad where her family lived.

There were no bomb shelters in our village and when the planes began shooting at us, we all just ran into a neighboring forest to hide, Vetikova, 86, told The St. Petersburg Times on the eve of the 70th anniversary of the end of the Siege of Leningrad, also known as the Blockade, to be celebrated on Jan. 27.

The planes flew so low that we could see the faces and goggles of the Nazi pilots. I still cant forget how they smiled as they shot at us! Vetikova said.

When she returned home after one such air attack, however, she realized that she had lost her stammer.

Im even ashamed to speak of it, but its a fact, she said.

You may also be interested in: New Book Challenges Leningrad Siege Myths

Vetikova was one of around a million people who lived through both the Nazi air raids on Leningrad and the experience of the Blockade. Although she lived 36 kilometers outside of the city, the area of her residence was also cut off from the rest of the country by Nazi troops.

The situation in our village was better than in Leningrad itself because we had peat to burn for warmth and we had easy access to water. The situation with food, however, was terrible. We ate anything we could find: Pine bark, potato peels and that famous 125 grams of Blockade bread, Vetikova said.

The siege of Leningrad was a prolonged military operation undertaken by Germanys Army Group North against Leningrad, as St. Petersburg was then known. The siege started on Sept. 8, 1941, when the last road connecting the city to the rest of the country was severed. Although the Soviets managed to open a narrow land corridor to the city on Jan. 18, 1943, the siege was finally lifted just over a year later, on Jan. 27, 1944. Lasting 872 days, the Siege of Leningrad was one of the longest and most destructive blockades in history and overwhelmingly the most costly in terms of casualties.

Pages: [1] [2 ] [3]






 

ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, Sept. 3


Although thesand sculptures at the Peter and Paul Fortress are more centrally located and therefore more visible to the throngs of tourists, the 300th Anniversary Park of St. Petersburgs own collection closes today so fans of the classic beach activity should get there while they can.



Thursday, Sept. 4


Vladimir I. Danchenkov, Head of Baltic Customs, will be in attendance during AmChams Customs and Transportation Committee Meeting convening this afternoon at the organizations office near St. Isaacs Square at 3 p.m.



Friday, Sept. 5


Scrabble lovers and chess masters get their chance to assert their intellectual dominance at the return of the British Book Centers Board Game Evenings tonight. Held weekly on Friday nights, the event gives both board game lovers and those hoping to improve their English the chance to meet, greet and compete. Check out the centers VK page for more details.



Saturday, Sept. 6


Athletes will relish the chance to get the latest gear and try out something new at I Choose Sport, an annual event at Lenexpo forum that plans to welcome more than 30,000 people this week to the international exhibition center. Not only will visitors get to try their hand at various athletic endeavors but they will also be able to peruse equipment that can fulfill their dreams of becoming a champion.


Local KHL team SKA St. Petersburg open their season this evening at home against Lokomotiv Yarovslavl at the Ice Palace arena next to the Prospekt Bolshevikov metro station. See their website for a full schedule and available tickets.



Sunday, Sept. 7


Check out retro and antique cars at Fort Konstantin on Kronstadt Island in the Gulf of Finland at FORTuna, a yearly car festival that highlights the eccentricities of the Soviet automobile industry. A car race, contests and a stunt show will give visitors a chance to rev their engines.



Monday, Sept. 8


This evening marks the opening of the two-week ballet festival High Season at the Mikhailovsky Theater. Check the theaters website for more details about performances and featured dancers.



Tuesday, Sept. 9


Discuss the latest news and issues at the AmCham Hazardous Waste Management Roundtable this morning in the Tango Conference Hall of the Sokos Hotel Palace Bridge on Birzhevoy Pereulok. Starting at 9 a.m., planned topics include the Krasny Bor landfill and waste transportation between Russia and Finland.


Learn more about the citys modern architectural trends at the SPIBA Real Estate and Construction Committees meeting on the topic Contemporary Petersburg Style: What is It? Participants will get the chance to discuss whats in-demand with RBI Holdings Irina Petrova and Lubava Pryanikova, and the current state of the local real estate market. Please confirm your attendance by Sept. 5 through SPIBAs website if you wish to attend.



Times Talk