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Mendeleyev Didn’t Invent Vodka, Experts Reiterate

Published: February 13, 2014 (Issue # 1797)



  • A portrait of Dmitry Mendeleev.
    Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Dmitry Mendeleyev, the Russian scientist known worldwide for the invention of the periodic table of elements and whose birthday was celebrated on Feb. 8, did not invent vodka, St. Petersburg scientists said last week.

Related: Forget Vodka and Chemistry, Thank Mendeleev for Economics

“Mendeleyev researched the theory of solutions and did not invent vodka,” said Viktor Tupik, a vice-principal of St. Petersburg’s Electric and Technical University at a press conference last Thursday to break the widely spread stereotype about the scientist, Interfax reported.

Academician Vladimir Shevchenko, director of the Grebenschikov Silicate Chemistry Institute of the Russian Academy of Science, said that Mendeleyev did not test vodka but studied what volume it should be sold in.

“Mendeleyev determined that the volume vodka is sold in now is the most profitable for sale,” Shevchenko said.

Despite regular denials by historians and chemists, many people still believe the incorrect stereotype that Mendeleyev was the one to have invented Russia’s most famous alcoholic drink.

Mendeleyev, who was the 17th child of a Siberian family, studied in St. Petersburg and later taught at St. Petersburg State University.

On Feb. 8 the traditional midday canon fired at the city’s Peter and Paul Fortress was dedicated to the birthday of the scientist.

From Apr. 1 to 4, Mendeleyev 2014, the eighth annual chemistry conference, will take place at the St. Petersburg State University.

Mendeleyev was known for numerous achievements across the entire spectrum of sciences, such as chemistry, physics, meteorology and others. He formulated the Periodic Law, created his own version of the periodic table of elements and used it to adjust the properties of some previously discovered elements as well as to predict the properties of elements yet to be discovered.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Saturday, Oct. 25


AVA Expo, the eighth edition of the event revolving around all things pop, returns to Lenexpo this weekend. Geeks, nerds, dweebs and dorks will have their chance to talk science fiction and explore a variety of international pop culture. Tickets for the event can be purchased on their website at avaexpo.ru.



Sunday, Oct. 26


Zenit St. Petersburg returns home for the first time in nearly a month as they host Mordovia Saransk in a Russian Premier League game. Currently at the top of the league thanks to their undefeated start to the season, the northern club hopes to extend the gap between them and second-place CSKA Moscow and win the title for the first time in three years. Tickets are available at the stadium box office or on the club’s website.



Monday, Oct. 27


Today marks the end of the art exhibit “Neophobia” at the Erarta Museum. Artists Alexey Semichov and Andrei Kuzmin took a neo-modernist approach to represent the array of fears that are ever-present throughout our lives. Tickets are 200 rubles ($4.90).



Tuesday, Oct. 28


The Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel plays host to SPIBA’s Marketing and Communications Committee’s round table discussion on “Government Relations Practices in Russia” this morning. The discussion starts at 9:30 a.m. and participation must be confirmed by Oct. 24.



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