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Nothing to Stop the Pain

Published: February 12, 2014 (Issue # 1797)




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Afew days ago, retired Rear Admiral Vyacheslav Apanasenko put anend tohis own life. He earlier helped develop theBulava missile but later struggled with terminal cancer. Although he had little hope ofsurviving, he could have spent his remaining days inthe company offriends andrelatives. Former Apple CEO Steve Jobs died froma similar illness, andhe managed tocontinue working almost right up until theend. Apanasenko preferred shooting himself. Inhis case, euthanasia was preferable tothe treatment provided bythe medical system.

Euthanasia is illegal inRussia, but it remains common practice. Relatives kill their loved ones rather than watch them suffer inagony without painkillers. Patients commit suicide, andone patient even killed his doctor who was prolonging his torment before taking his own life.

News reports have been rather vague inexplaining Apanasenkos cause ofdeath. Thenewspaper Rossiiskaya Gazeta reported only that he had aserious case ofcancer andexperienced difficulty obtaining painkillers. But his daughter gave amore dramatic description ofthe situation ina Facebook post:

Papa had late-stage pancreatic cancer, she wrote. He courageously endured thepain. Mama tried toobtain themorphine he had been prescribed. Toget afive-day supply ofvials, forseveral days she had torun fromoffice tooffice inthe medical center forhours ata time. Onthe final day, she was short ofone signature when themedical center closed. She came home completely burned out andwithout theanesthetics. Papa was outraged. This was thelast straw. That night he got everything ready andleft anote clearly stating his reasons. I ask that you not blame anyone except theHealth Ministry andthe government. I am prepared tosuffer, but it is intolerable tosee my loved ones suffer. He wrote thetime anddate andsigned it. Then he took his prized pistol. I think that with this act he wanted todraw attention tohow cancer patients are treated inRussia.

TheFederal Drug Control Service headed byViktor Ivanov, alongtime associate ofPresidentVladimir Putin, created this inhumane system forcontrolling theissuance ofpainkillers.

Terminally ill patients andthose insevere pain must navigate ahellish bureaucracy toobtain even five vials ofpotent painkillers. Then, they must return theunused vials andbottle labels after thepatient has died. Not only is it difficult andfrustrating toget theclinic staff tosign off onthe returned items, but therelatives are held criminally responsible forfailing todo so even if they have accidentally lost them. Cancer patients are assigned toa single pharmacy that works with themedical center or cancer clinic inquestion. If that pharmacy does not have themedicines forwhatever reason, thepatient is left toscream inpain or die ofshock. Insome cases, individuals with late-stage cancer must personally appear toreceive aprescription forthe medicines that can relieve their suffering. Long weekends or holidays become aliving nightmare forpatients andtheir relatives because each prescription covers only ashort period andregulations make it impossible tostock up inadvance.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, July 31


Develop your leadership abilities during a lecture by famous Russian author and coach Radislav Gandapas. The event starts at 9 a.m. at 5 Lodeinopolskaya Ulitsa. The price for entry is 20,500 rubles ($570).


Relax and enjoy a Parisian atmosphere with some romantic and laidback jazz tunes during the Night of French Music at Lenny Jam Cafe, 63 Ligovsky Prospekt. The entrance fee is 250 rubles ($7).


The Womens Business Club is hosting a Beauty Brunch where participants are invited to discuss the latest news in the beauty industry and listen to lectures by professional stylists in the business.



Friday, Aug. 1


Bikers from all around the world will gather to take part in a parade, extreme shows and rock concerts during the International Biker Festival that revs its engines today and runs through Aug. 3 near Olgino Hotel, 4/2 Primorskogo Shosse.


The Peter and Paul Fortress will be turned into an open-air cinema today and tomorrow as part of the 5th International Short and Animation Film Festival. A huge screen across the fortress walls will air short films non-stop with board games, photo sessions and other activities also on offer for visitors. For more information, visit www.opencinemafest.ru



Saturday, Aug. 2


Gatchina Palace Park Museum will host its second annual Night of Light, an impressive audio-visual show across the night sky. Tickets are 600 rubles ($16).


If graphic design is more your thing then check out Illustration Day, where you will be able to visit an exhibition, attend lectures by professionals and even show experts some of your own work. The event starts at noon at Zona Deystvia, 73 Ligovsky Prospekt. The entrance fee is 350 rubles ($10).



Sunday, Aug. 3


History lovers shouldnt miss the chance to see reenactments of World War I battles in Pushkin at noon. Besides exciting war scenes, visitors can enjoy live music, historical costumes, an equestrian show and a fancy-dress parade starting from the Moscow gates.


Garage Sale, the popular and growing flea market where nothing is priced over 500 rubles ($14.11), starts today at noon in Loft-Project Etagi, 74 Ligovsky Prospekt. Be sure to get in early to score a bargain. Entry costs 50 rubles ($1.40)



Monday, Aug. 4


Continue the working week with a calm and steady mind with a free yoga lesson at 7 p.m. in the Bukvoyed store at 23A Vladimirsky Prospekt.



Tuesday, Aug. 5


Visit The Romanov Dynasty doll exhibition today, where more than fifty porcelain dolls depicting Russian rulers, and made by Olina Ventzel, will be on show. The exhibition continues through Aug. 31 in Sheremetyev Palace, 34 Fontanka Naberezhnaya.



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