Wednesday, September 17, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

The Romanovs in St. Petersburg

History of St. Petersburg Museum

Small Tragedy, Fatal Passion

Rimsky-Korsakov Apartment Museum

 

Перевести на русский Перевести на русский Print this article Print this article

Doing Business in Russia as an Expat

Published: February 18, 2014 (Issue # 1797)




  • Photo:

Are you thinking of looking for a job or even starting a business in Russia? Expats working in Russia number among the highest paid worldwide, with one-third earning over 250,000 USD per year. There are many opportunities in the fields of human resources, business development, IT and finance. The industrial sector, especially energy, construction and metallurgy, also offers many jobs. A good number of expats also find jobs in Russia in the management tier.

A special visa category exists for highly-qualified professionals. These work visas are processed within weeks, and have no quotas, but in order to qualify for this type of visa you must earn a minimum of two million rubles (57,800 USD) per year. If your position does not qualify you for this visa category, your potential employer must apply for a corporate work permit at least one year in advance. Since there are annual quotas for the number of foreign work permits that can be issued per year, there is no guarantee that your application will be successful.

If your dream is to open your own business in Russia, it is important to do your research and know what to expect and what you are getting yourself into. The rules and regulations for companies and businesses in Russia may vary considerably from those in your home country. First of all, you need to know what kind of business you’re allowed to open as a foreigner. Generally, there are no restrictions for foreigners who wish to open a business in Russia, except if they are in the fields of insurance, air transportation or gas supply. There are also restrictions for foreign investors who wish to invest in companies active in the strategic sector.

Next you need to decide what type of legal form your company will have. Depending on different factors, you can register it as a limited liability company or a joint stock company. Foreign companies are also allowed to open branches in Russia. If you wish to register yourself as an individual entrepreneur, then you must first possess a temporary or permanent residence permit.

Before going to Russia to open your company, you should visit on a fact-finding trip. On this trip, you can learn more about the local economy and do some market research. How is business done in your branch or field? What are differences between how things are done in Russia and in your home country? Will your business be catering mostly to expats or locals as well? In the latter case, be sure to learn as much as you can about local lifestyles, attitudes and wants. Is your business addressing a local need in the community?

Pages: [1] [2]






 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, Sept. 17


AmCham’s Investment and Legal Committee Meeting convenes this morning in their office in the New St. Isaac Office Center at 9 a.m.


Learn more about the science of teaching English at today’s EFL Seminar hosted by the British Book Center. Revolving around the topic of learning styles, the workshop will help attendees better understand the different effective learning methods that can be implemented to learn English more effectively.



Thursday, Sept. 18


Get your nerd on at Boomfest, St. Petersburg’s answer to the United States’ popular ComicCon. Starting today, this international festival of comics will take over venues throughout the city center and includes exhibitions of comics and illustrations, film screenings, competitions and the chance to meet the genre’s authors, artists and experts.



Friday, Sept. 19


SPIBA’s newest addition to their Cultural Discoveries events is “Handmade in Germany,” an exhibition featuring unique handmade objects of a significantly higher quality than mass-produced items. The work of over 100 German manufacturers will be displayed during the event, which opens today in the Lutheran Church of Saint Peter and Paul on Nevsky Prospekt and runs through Sept. 28.



Saturday, Sept. 20


Starting on Sept. 18 and ending tomorrow is the Extreme Fantasy Wakeboarding Festival in Sunpark by Sredny Suzdalskoye lake in the Ozerki region of the city.


Those after something more laid back can instead head to Jazz and Wine night at TerraVino with legendary jazz guitarist Ildar Kazahanov. 12/14 Admiralteyskaya Emb.



Sunday, Sept. 21


Learn more about African culture and get some exercise during today’s “Djembe and Vuvuzela,” a bike ride starting in Palace Square that includes several stops where riders can listen to the music of Africa or watch short films about the continent. The riders plan to set off at 4 p.m. and all you need to join is a set of wheels.



Monday, Sept. 22


Do you love puppetry? If so, then be sure to go to BTK-Fest, a five-day festival that starts on Sept. 19 celebrating the art. Contemporaries from France, Belgium, the U.K. and other countries will join Russian artists to put on theatrical performances involving a variety of themes, materials and eras. Workshops and meetings are also scheduled for a chance to discuss the artistic medium in further depth.



Tuesday, Sept. 23


Marina Suhih, Director of the External Communications Department at Rostelecom North-West, and Yana Donskaya, HR Director for Northern Capital Gateway are just some of the confirmed participants of today’s round table discussion on “Interaction with Trade Unions” being hosted by SPIBA. Confirm your attendance with SPIBA by Sept. 22.


Kino Expo 2014, an international film industry convention, will be at LenExpo from today until Sept. 26. The third largest exhibition of film equipment in the world, the expo focuses on not only Russia but former Soviet republics as well.



Times Talk