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Group Fights to Save Wooden Buildings

Seven historic wooden buildings have been torn down in Pushkin over the last two years.

Published: February 19, 2014 (Issue # 1798)



  • Neglected wooden architecture in and around St. Petersburg is disappearing at an alarming rate.
    Photo: Christiaan Triebert / flickr

St. Petersburg Governor Georgy Poltavchenko spoke with activists advocating preservation of the city’s architectural heritage on Feb. 5. Film director Alexander Sokurov, the coordinator of Zhivoi Gorod public movement Yulia Minutina, Vice-Governor Marat Oganesyan and the Legislative Assembly Deputy Maksim Reznik all attended the meeting.

The governor supported the activists’ initiative to rent out prominent historical sites with wooden architecture in the city and its suburbs to investors at a low price, provided that they fully renovate them. According to the activists, all wooden architecture in and around St. Petersburg is in critical condition. Over the past decade, wooden mansions and villas, which used to be a point of pride in St. Petersburg, have vanished from the suburbs. In fact, such buildings appear to be one of the most vulnerable aspects of the city’s architectural heritage. Poltavchenko promised to consider the project.

The Cultural Heritage Preservation Council proposed a similar project in 2013. Restoring wooden buildings is an expensive and labor-intensive process, so private-public partnerships have been floated to address the issue. According to the council’s work group, who inspected 80 examples of wooden architecture in 2013, seven buildings have been torn down in Pushkin over the last two years and 15 buildings were destroyed in the Kurortny District during the last ten years. Oranienbaum has suffered the most tremendous loss: almost no wooden mansions remain there.

A similar project was approved and completed in Moscow in 2012. The program was called Monument for a Ruble (Pamyatnik za Rubl). When the city could no longer afford the restoration of architectural monuments it turned to private investors.

Under the program, historical sites are rented to investors for 49 years. If the building is restored within in five years, he is offered a lease at the minimum rate of 1 ruble ($0,03) per square meter. Prolonged reconstruction results in a fine. Such experience has already been considered successful in many cities outside Russia.

Officials and activists at the meeting also announced a decision to build a memorial and museum for the Izhora line of defense in Kupchino, where they have already reconstructed one of the World War II bunkers there. In addition to this, a decision on the Nikolsky market restoration on Ulitsa Sadovaya is to be submitted by the Cultural Heritage Preservation Council.

Another issue raised at the meeting concerned the law against demolishing buildings without first seeking permission for construction, which was approved last year. The power to oversee compliance and levy fines to builders who violate the law have not been distributed among the various city authorities responsible for building in the city. As a result of the meeting, the participants agreed to the creation of an interdepartmental working group, run by Oganesyan, which is to consider all contentious construction cases in the historic city center.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Aug. 1


Bikers from all around the world will gather to take part in a parade, extreme shows and rock concerts during the International Biker Festival that revs its engines today and runs through Aug. 3 near Olgino Hotel, 4/2 Primorskogo Shosse.


The Peter and Paul Fortress will be turned into an open-air cinema today and tomorrow as part of the 5th International Short and Animation Film Festival. A huge screen across the fortress walls will air short films non-stop with board games, photo sessions and other activities also on offer for visitors. For more information, visit www.opencinemafest.ru



Saturday, Aug. 2


Gatchina Palace Park Museum will host its second annual Night of Light, an impressive audio-visual show across the night sky. Tickets are 600 rubles ($16).


If graphic design is more your thing then check out Illustration Day, where you will be able to visit an exhibition, attend lectures by professionals and even show experts some of your own work. The event starts at noon at Zona Deystvia, 73 Ligovsky Prospekt. The entrance fee is 350 rubles ($10).



Sunday, Aug. 3


History lovers shouldn’t miss the chance to see reenactments of World War I battles in Pushkin at noon. Besides exciting war scenes, visitors can enjoy live music, historical costumes, an equestrian show and a fancy-dress parade starting from the Moscow gates.


Garage Sale, the popular and growing flea market where nothing is priced over 500 rubles ($14.11), starts today at noon in Loft-Project Etagi, 74 Ligovsky Prospekt. Be sure to get in early to score a bargain. Entry costs 50 rubles ($1.40)



Monday, Aug. 4


Continue the working week with a calm and steady mind with a free yoga lesson at 7 p.m. in the Bukvoyed store at 23A Vladimirsky Prospekt.



Tuesday, Aug. 5


Visit The Romanov Dynasty doll exhibition today, where more than fifty porcelain dolls depicting Russian rulers, and made by Olina Ventzel, will be on show. The exhibition continues through Aug. 31 in Sheremetyev Palace, 34 Fontanka Naberezhnaya.



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