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Andrey Gusev: Transparency and Communication

Published: March 12, 2014 (Issue # 1801)



  • Andrey Gusev finds that an international outlook is one of the keys to his success, despite remaining in St. Petersburg.
    Photo: Yekaterina Kuzmina / Vedomosti

Andrey Gusev, the head of the St. Petersburg office of Finnish law firm Borenius, sees himself as a rare example of a professional who, unlike many of his colleagues, remained in St. Petersburg rather than seeking his fortune abroad or in Moscow. Highly regarded in international rankings, Gusev chose to stay in his home country when he met his future wife at a crucial turning point in his career.

Related: Thibaut Fourriere Finds Home in Petersburg

With more than 20 years experience working in different countries, Gusev is seeing more and more similarities between the different nations. As a result, he believes that firms need to up their game if they want to succeed. It is now no longer enough to be a Finnish firm and wait for the Finnish clients to roll through the door. Gusev sat with The St. Petersburg Times in his firm’s offices and explained what lawyers providing premium legal services need to do to survive in an increasingly competitive market. Gusev also shared his concerns over the amount of newly qualified lawyers flooding the job market and his thoughts on how this trend should be addressed.

Related: Ilya Shtrom - Building Brand Loyalty

Q: You career spans several decades, how did you start out?

A: I began studying in the Soviet Union and graduated in Russia. All the significant changes in the country happened during my second and third years of study. We witnessed the development of a market economy. It was a turbulent time when many of us started working. I got my first job as a partner of a law firm in 1992, before I had my diploma. This fact now seems unusual to my foreign colleagues.

In 1994, I joined Arthur Andersen where I was working in the tax department. In 1996, I moved to Ernst&Young. That was a very interesting period with a trip to New York, where I gained my first international experience. Then there were 13 years spent with Mannheimer Swartling, after which I moved to Borenius.

Q: What impact did your working in New York have on you?

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