Sunday, October 26, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS Download APP
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

19th Century Portraits

History of St. Petersburg Museum: Rumyantsev Mansion

 

  Print this article Print this article

TV Anchor Implies Threat to U.S.

Published: March 19, 2014 (Issue # 1802)



  • Kiselyov speaking on his news program on state television on Sunday.
    Photo: Rossia 1

An anchor on state-run television threatened that Russia could turn the U.S. into radioactive ashes and showed a simulation of a Russian nuclear strike during his program on the U.S. response to Russias interference in Ukraine.

Dmitry Kiselyov, who hosts a current affairs talk show on the Rossiya television network and heads a new Kremlin-backed news agency, accused U.S. President Barack Obama of supposedly dithering in talks with President Vladimir Putin, and suggested on his Sunday program that the U.S. leader was intimidated by his Kremlin opponent, who is not an easy one.

And Russia is the only country that could really turn the U.S. into radioactive ashes, Kiselyov said, against the backdrop of a mushroom cloud from a nuclear blast appearing on a huge screen behind him.

Kiselyov also suggested that threats of a nuclear strike were coming from the Kremlin.

I do not know if this is a coincidence or what, but here was Obama calling Putin on Jan. 21 probably, again trying to pressure somehow and the very next day, on Jan. 22, the official media outlet of the Russian government ran an article that spelled out in simple terms how our system of nuclear response works, he said.

While Kiselyovs comment suggested that Obamas Jan. 21 call had to do with the Ukrainian crisis, an earlier statement from the White House said the U.S. leader spoke to Putin on that day to wish him a safe and secure Olympics in Sochi.

The Kremlin has unleashed a large-scale propaganda war over Moscows takeover of Crimea and the peninsulas referendum on Sunday, in which more than 90 percent of voters cast supported seceding from Ukraine to Russia, according to preliminary results released by Crimeas pro-Russian administration.

The promotion by state-run television of the Kremlins views has also helped Putins approval ratings in the country to soar to 72 percent this month, a recent survey by the Levada pollster showed.

The poll, conducted on March 7-10 among 1,603 people around Russia, gave a margin of error of 3.4 percentage points.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Sunday, Oct. 26


Zenit St. Petersburg returns home for the first time in nearly a month as they host Mordovia Saransk in a Russian Premier League game. Currently at the top of the league thanks to their undefeated start to the season, the northern club hopes to extend the gap between them and second-place CSKA Moscow and win the title for the first time in three years. Tickets are available at the stadium box office or on the clubs website.



Monday, Oct. 27


Today marks the end of the art exhibit Neophobia at the Erarta Museum. Artists Alexey Semichov and Andrei Kuzmin took a neo-modernist approach to represent the array of fears that are ever-present throughout our lives. Tickets are 200 rubles ($4.90).



Tuesday, Oct. 28


The Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel plays host to SPIBAs Marketing and Communications Committees round table discussion on Government Relations Practices in Russia this morning. The discussion starts at 9:30 a.m. and participation must be confirmed by Oct. 24.



Times Talk