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Cabinet Outlines Costs of Crimea

Published: March 25, 2014 (Issue # 1802)



  • Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev at a meeting on Monday dedicated to the socioeconomic development of Crimea.
    Photo: Government.ru

The costly consequences of expanding Russia's territory became clearer Monday when Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev revealed a Crimea to-do list for the government and its corporations.

Russia will need to take care of entitlements and services ranging from retirement pensions to tax rebates to electricity supply in a peninsula that has no overland links with its new sovereign and used to be part of a different country, Ukraine, just a few days ago.

"It is the first time in the history of contemporary Russia that the Cabinet has to solve a problem that is so massive and multidimensional," Medvedev said. "It is a good way to show the potential of the contemporary Russian state as well as its managerial skills."

Crimea formally became a Russian region on March 18 after a referendum that remains unrecognized in the West, and that has brought about a string of sanctions slapped by the U.S. and European Union on Russian government officials, businesspeople and a bank described as the preferred financial institution of President Vladimir Putin's inner circle.

In one of the most expensive measures Medvedev announced Monday, the government could spend 36 billion rubles ($1 billion) this year on getting Crimean pensions up to par with the rest of Russia. About a third of the peninsula's population of 2 million people are pensioners.

The impact of the money inflow could be so strong as to send local consumer prices climbing, Medvedev warned. He called for a gradual schedule of increasing the payouts.

At the same time, other welfare benefits to be provided by Russia that Crimeans used to have from the Ukrainian government will remain at the existing level for a transitional period that ends in January next year, Medvedev said.

"Nobody should lose anything," he said.

In another expense, Medvedev said that the government would raise the salaries of workers in Crimea paid from the state budget to match the average Russian level for these types of jobs. He referred primarily to teachers, healthcare workers and staff at museums and libraries.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Monday, Oct. 20


Amateur pictures from World War I are on display for only one more day at Rosphoto’s exhibition “On Both Sides,” chronicling the conflict through the eyes of observers on both sides of the trenches. The price of entrance to the exhibition is 100 rubles ($2.50).



Tuesday, Oct. 21


The Environment, Health and Safety Committee of AmCham convenes this morning at 9 a.m. in the organization’s office.


Take the chance to pick the brains of Dmitry V. Krivenok, the deputy director of the Economic Development Agency of the Leningrad region, and Mikhail D. Sergeev, the head of the Investment Projects Department, during the meeting with them this morning hosted by SPIBA. RSVP for the event by emailing office@spiba.ru before Oct. 17 if you wish to attend.


Improve your English at Interactive English, the British Book Center’s series of lessons on vocabulary and grammar in an informal atmosphere. Starting at 6 p.m., each month draws attention to different topics in English, with the topic for this month’s lessons being “visual arts.”



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