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Sanction Crimea, Not the Kremlin

Published: March 27, 2014 (Issue # 1803)


The conflict between Russia and the Western world has created a complicated dilemma. The West feels compelled to respond to Russia's open violation of international and legal norms but is afraid to disrupt economic ties with Russia and undermine the economic growth that is starting to take place in the U.S. and some parts of Europe. This dilemma explains why the West chose narrow sanctions, but they are largely ineffective.

It seems strange to apply sanctions against "Putin's friends" for example, businessmen Arkady and Boris Rotenberg. Even if Putin and the two brothers are old friends from St. Petersburg, nobody really believes they could talk Putin out of taking decisive action. And even if they feel a little pain from the sanctions, surely Putin has ways of making up for the loss.

The annexation of Crimea caused the present conflict with the West. But is it fair to blame ordinary Russians for the Kremlin's aggression? The West has nothing to gain from undermining the Russian economy. Therefore, the sanctions should be extremely focused on Crimea.

Not a single major country has recognized the legitimacy of the annexation. Thus, Crimea is a territory de facto occupied by a foreign state. The most effective sanctions would therefore apply to companies working in the occupied zone.

The West should target all individuals and companies complicit in the crime. All State Duma deputies who voted in favor of annexing Crimea should become personae non gratae. Whatever faults Bank Rossiya might have, it holds no direct connection to the Kremlin's adventurism.

When sanctions are applied, they should be a response to actions, not an attempt to forestall them. Any business that carries out operations on occupied territory is contributing to the occupation and should therefore be subjected to sanctions.

If, for example, Aeroflot has flights to Simferopol, its agreements with Europe and the U.S. should be suspended. If Sberbank opens branch offices in Yalta, no bank in the world should honor Sberbank cards or accounts. If Gazprom lays a pipeline across the Kerch Strait, its South Stream project should be shut down.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Oct. 31


Put your grammar and logical thinking to the test in a fun and friendly environment during the British Book Centers Board Game Evening starting at 5 p.m. today. The event is free and all are welcome to attend.



Saturday, Nov. 1


The men and women who dedicate their lives to fitness get their chance to compete for the title of best body in Russia at todays Grand Prix Fitness House PRO, the nations premier bodybuilding competition. Not only will men and women be competing for thousands of dollars in prizes and a trip to represent their nation at Mr. Olympia but sporting goods and nutritional supplements will also be available for sale. Learn more about the culture of the Indian subcontinent during Diwali, the annual festival of lights that will be celebrated in St. Petersburg this weekend at the Culture Palace on Tambovskaya Ul. For 100 rubles ($2.40), festival-goers listen to Indian music, try on traditional Indian outfits and sample dishes highlighting the culinary diversity of the billion-plus people in the South Asian superpower.



Sunday, Nov. 2


Check out the latest video and interactive games at the Gaming Festival at the Mayakovsky Library ending today. Meet with the developers of the popular and learn more about their work, or learn how to play one of their creations with the opportunity to ask the creators themselves about the exact rules.



Monday, Nov. 3


Non-athletes can get feed their need for competition without breaking a sweat at the Rock-Paper-Scissors tournament this evening at the Cube Bar at Lomonosova 1. Referees will judge the validity of each matchup award points to winners while the citys elite fight for the chance to be called the best of the best. Those hoping to play must arrange a team beforehand and pay 200 rubles ($4.80) to enter.



Tuesday, Nov. 4


Attend the premiere of Canadian director Xavier Dolans latest film Mommy at the Avrora theater this evening. The fifth picture from the 25-year-old, it is the story of an unruly teenager but the most alluring (or unappealing) aspect is the way the film was shot: in a 1:1 format that is more reminiscent of Instagram videos than cinematic art. Tickets cost 400 rubles ($9.60) and snacks and drinks will be available.



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