Thursday, August 28, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

The Romanovs in St. Petersburg

History of St. Petersburg Museum

Small Tragedy, Fatal Passion

Rimsky-Korsakov Apartment Museum

 

  Print this article Print this article

Eco-Items Gain Popularity

The Ecological Union reports that 74 percent of customers look for eco-labels while shopping.

Published: April 23, 2014 (Issue # 1807)



  • Russian businesses are looking to show a greater interest in providing eco-friendly products for customers.
    Photo: Magne Kveseth / norden.org

When it comes to sustaining the environment, it seems businesses and consumers in St. Petersburg do not share the same values. According to data from the St. Petersburg Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs, only 15 percent of industrial enterprises in the city are interested in pursuing ecologically safe production, while customers are increasingly ready to pay up to 30 percent more for environmentally friendly products.

Related: Eco-Consciousness on the Rise in Russia

To further discuss the data and current trends, local entrepreneurs are today meeting with Russian and European environmental experts at the Corinthia St. Petersburg Hotel.

With the key focus on eco-production and eco-consumption, the Environmental Standards in Business: New Opportunities for Companies and Consumers conference has been organized by Russias Ecological Union in partnership with the Nordic Council of Ministers, with support from the local chapter of the Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs. As well as presenting recent findings and data, specialists in eco-labeling programs from Norway will also share their experience in the Nordic business sector during the event.

Related: Russian Companies Go Green!

Eco-labeling is a tool to help customers identify the real ecological products from the fake ones, said Yulia Gracheva, director of the Ecological Union St. Petersburg, speaking to The St. Petersburg Times. It is widely-used in international practice and is granted to a product or service only when it successfully passes all tests, including the extraction of raw materials, structure analyses and production processes.

According to data from the Ecological Union, 74 percent of customers look for the presence of eco-labeling when buying a product. As a result, many companies aim to participate in the eco-labeling programs such as Vitality Leaf. Many local enterprises have already passed the strict certification process to gain the right to use this recognized symbol on their products, which includes document checks, laboratory testing and on-site audits of the production process.

Environmental certification also includes a provision for annual follow-up inspections. Among the local companies that have successfully attained the certification are the Corinthia St. Petersburg Hotel, Splat (pharmaceutical and cosmetic production), Tarkett (flooring and sports surfaces), Saint-Gobain (construction and innovative materials), Profine Rus (plastic window frames), TechnoNICOL (the largest mineral wool manufacturer in Russia) and the Ingosstrakhinsurance company.

Pages: [1] [2]






 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Thursday, Aug. 28


Learn more about the citys upcoming municipal elections during the presentation of the project Road Map for the Municipal Elections being presented this evening in the conference hall on the third floor of Biblioteka at 21 Nevsky Prospekt. Steve Kaddins, a coordinator for Beautiful St. Petersburg, which gives residents an online forum to lodge complaints about infrastructure problems in the city, will be on hand to answer any questions. The meeting starts at 7 p.m. and is open to all.



Friday, Aug. 29


Park Pobedy will feature the sights and sounds of the world outside of Russia during the Open Art International Festival today. Taste foreign cuisine, learn how to make tea like the Chinese or relax in a hammock during the free event. Although entrance is free, you must register beforehand if you wish to attend.



Saturday, Aug. 30


Break out the tweed and channel your inner Englishman during the English Hunt Picnic this afternoon organized by the Bagmut stables from Krasny Bor in the Leningrad Oblast. Equestrian stunts, English archery and classic hunting fashion will all be available to visitors hoping to live like the characters in Downton Abbey if only for a day. Tickets for the event cost 7,900 rubles ($219.40).


Bookworms will have their chance to swap out well-read classics for something new for their bookshelves at Knigovorot, a free book exchange that will be held in the Yusupov Garden on Sadovaya Ulitsa today. Come for the chance to get a new book or take the opportunity to discuss the literary merits of your favorite authors with fellow fans.



Sunday, Aug. 31


The Neva Delta International Blues Festival wraps up this afternoon on Vasilevsky Island with a concert featuring not only some of Russias best blues bands but international stars as well. Admission is free for all three days of the festival, which begins on Aug. 29, and the shows starting at 5 p.m. each day.



Monday, Sept. 1


Today marks the beginning of Lermontov-Fest, a fall festival celebrating the life of one of Russias most remarkable poets who, in a fate eerily similar to Pushkins, was killed in a duel at the age of 26. Organized by the Lermontov Library System, the next several months will see art exhibitions, concerts and public lectures focusing on the Lermontovs short yet prolific career. Check the Lermontov Library Systems website for more details.



Tuesday, Sept. 2


Join expats and practice your Russian during the Russian Clubs weekly meetings every Tuesday night at 7:30 p.m. The club is free to participate in although you need to be a registered member of Couchsurfing.



Times Talk