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Crimea Worsens Economic Crisis

Published: April 30, 2014 (Issue # 1808)


It is no simple task foreconomists tocalculate thecosts ofRussias current foreign policy course, thelosses resulting fromfrightened investors andcreditors andthe damage that sanctions will cause. Some claim that any lack ofenthusiasm forthe economy however justifiable is patently unpatriotic. Others hold just theopposite view, condemning any attempt topropose this or that economic policy given theposition inwhich Russia now finds itself.

Before seizing Crimea, thegovernment should have done more toreduce corruption andimprove theclimate forbusinesses andforeign investors. Theevents inCrimea andeastern Ukraine make both foreign anddomestic investors even more skittish. They also lower Russians faith inthe ruble andin Russian banks.

There is now aneven greater need toimprove theenvironment forbusiness andinvestors. Thequestions Russias leaders need toask themselves are: How can we give businesspeople more investment opportunities? How can we facilitate technology transfer given theworsening situation?

Under thecurrent circumstances, Russia must focus onachieving aradical reduction inthe bureaucracy forbusinesses bysimplifying all procedures. Forstarters, Moscow could simplify therules forobtaining aRussian visa andwaive theneed forcertification if imported products have already been certified inthe U.S. or theEuropean Union.

Instead, it seems that authorities are competing with each other tosee who can do themost harm tothe economy. One top Russian official proposed selling off thecountrys dollar andeuro reserves without explaining how they would be replaced. Perhaps he would prefer theyen andyuan. But aquick look atthe currencies preferred bythe central banks ofother countries is enough toshow that they are far less reliable. Maybe he feels Russia should keep its money ingold.

Forevery difficult andcomplex situation, leaders should respond with better andmore responsible economic policy andnot just make matters worse.

Konstantin Sonin, acolumnist forVedomosti, is Professor ofEconomics andVice Rector atthe Higher School ofEconomics inMoscow.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Saturday, Nov. 1


The men and women who dedicate their lives to fitness get their chance to compete for the title of best body in Russia at todays Grand Prix Fitness House PRO, the nations premier bodybuilding competition. Not only will men and women be competing for thousands of dollars in prizes and a trip to represent their nation at Mr. Olympia but sporting goods and nutritional supplements will also be available for sale. Learn more about the culture of the Indian subcontinent during Diwali, the annual festival of lights that will be celebrated in St. Petersburg this weekend at the Culture Palace on Tambovskaya Ul. For 100 rubles ($2.40), festival-goers listen to Indian music, try on traditional Indian outfits and sample dishes highlighting the culinary diversity of the billion-plus people in the South Asian superpower.



Sunday, Nov. 2


Check out the latest video and interactive games at the Gaming Festival at the Mayakovsky Library ending today. Meet with the developers of the popular and learn more about their work, or learn how to play one of their creations with the opportunity to ask the creators themselves about the exact rules.



Monday, Nov. 3


Non-athletes can get feed their need for competition without breaking a sweat at the Rock-Paper-Scissors tournament this evening at the Cube Bar at Lomonosova 1. Referees will judge the validity of each matchup award points to winners while the citys elite fight for the chance to be called the best of the best. Those hoping to play must arrange a team beforehand and pay 200 rubles ($4.80) to enter.



Tuesday, Nov. 4


Attend the premiere of Canadian director Xavier Dolans latest film Mommy at the Avrora theater this evening. The fifth picture from the 25-year-old, it is the story of an unruly teenager but the most alluring (or unappealing) aspect is the way the film was shot: in a 1:1 format that is more reminiscent of Instagram videos than cinematic art. Tickets cost 400 rubles ($9.60) and snacks and drinks will be available.



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