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Students Discover the Importance of Victory Day

Published: May 7, 2014 (Issue # 1809)



  • Veterans of World War II and the Siege of Leningrad wave to crowds of spectators along Nevsky Prospekt (File).
    Photo: Alexander Belenky / SPT

As an assignment, a number of classes at St. Petersburg School 327 were asked to write about Victory Day, explaining why it is an important day to celebrate and what it means to them. Below includes just a small selection of some of the insightful and thoughtful words by these young students.

This is the day I remember my great-great-grandfather. His name was Martyan and I was named in honor of him. I dont know a lot about him, but I am very proud that I have his name. For me, May 9 is a great day that makes me cry for those who died, and to also remember the history behind my name. Martyan Baranov, 9th grade.

I dont think we would have won the war if it had happened now. Nowadays people are less united and think mostly about themselves. Today, if one sees a fight, he records it on his mobile instead of trying to stop it. The May 9 celebration affects everybody, as our lives today depended on that victory. Its victory unites people. It is a day of sorrow and happiness. Alexander Akimov, 7th grade.

This celebration is so important and significant in Russia because the war hurt every family, it affected every household. Gleb Schennikov, 9th grade.

For me, Victory Day is a reason to say thank you to all those who fought in the war and to think about my own life; to see how good everything is in my life and to appreciate it. I have a home, family and food these are the most important things one needs in life. Back during the tragic war years, not everybody had these three basic things. Listening to stories, reading articles and watching films about the war makes me think and want to do something useful for society. I dont want to live without a purpose, but instead do something wonderful. Liza Vedeneeva, 10th grade.

It was Russia that had the strongest resistance against Germany and it was Russia that suffered the largest loss. Most European countries did not resist or defend in the way that Russia did back then. The most severe battles, where thousands of people died, were in Russia. May 9 is an important day for us, as we honor the memory of the grandfathers and great-grandfathers who died in the war. Natalia Komarova, 9th grade.

I want to say thank you, that together with other people, you defended our Fatherland. Even in the harshest cold, you stayed on the battlefields and did not surrender. Thank you because we have never known what war is. In your eyes, you had the fire of hope while you ignored the fear that tried to take your heart. You did everything to give life to your children, grandsons and great-grandsons. War is a time of sorrow, death and fear. You went into battle with the hope and faith that you can change everything. I am sorry people of our generation continue to fight and bring harm to each other. We need to stop fighting; otherwise nothing will be left in our world. I believe that one day I will wake up on an earth, where murder is just a word, so that your efforts will not have been in vain. Dmitry Kabanov, 7th grade (part of a letter written to his great-grand father Vasily)





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Oct. 31


Put your grammar and logical thinking to the test in a fun and friendly environment during the British Book Centers Board Game Evening starting at 5 p.m. today. The event is free and all are welcome to attend.



Saturday, Nov. 1


The men and women who dedicate their lives to fitness get their chance to compete for the title of best body in Russia at todays Grand Prix Fitness House PRO, the nations premier bodybuilding competition. Not only will men and women be competing for thousands of dollars in prizes and a trip to represent their nation at Mr. Olympia but sporting goods and nutritional supplements will also be available for sale. Learn more about the culture of the Indian subcontinent during Diwali, the annual festival of lights that will be celebrated in St. Petersburg this weekend at the Culture Palace on Tambovskaya Ul. For 100 rubles ($2.40), festival-goers listen to Indian music, try on traditional Indian outfits and sample dishes highlighting the culinary diversity of the billion-plus people in the South Asian superpower.



Sunday, Nov. 2


Check out the latest video and interactive games at the Gaming Festival at the Mayakovsky Library ending today. Meet with the developers of the popular and learn more about their work, or learn how to play one of their creations with the opportunity to ask the creators themselves about the exact rules.



Monday, Nov. 3


Non-athletes can get feed their need for competition without breaking a sweat at the Rock-Paper-Scissors tournament this evening at the Cube Bar at Lomonosova 1. Referees will judge the validity of each matchup award points to winners while the citys elite fight for the chance to be called the best of the best. Those hoping to play must arrange a team beforehand and pay 200 rubles ($4.80) to enter.



Tuesday, Nov. 4


Attend the premiere of Canadian director Xavier Dolans latest film Mommy at the Avrora theater this evening. The fifth picture from the 25-year-old, it is the story of an unruly teenager but the most alluring (or unappealing) aspect is the way the film was shot: in a 1:1 format that is more reminiscent of Instagram videos than cinematic art. Tickets cost 400 rubles ($9.60) and snacks and drinks will be available.



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