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Students Discover the Importance of Victory Day

Published: May 7, 2014 (Issue # 1809)



  • Veterans of World War II and the Siege of Leningrad wave to crowds of spectators along Nevsky Prospekt (File).
    Photo: Alexander Belenky / SPT

As an assignment, a number of classes at St. Petersburg School 327 were asked to write about Victory Day, explaining why it is an important day to celebrate and what it means to them. Below includes just a small selection of some of the insightful and thoughtful words by these young students.

This is the day I remember my great-great-grandfather. His name was Martyan and I was named in honor of him. I dont know a lot about him, but I am very proud that I have his name. For me, May 9 is a great day that makes me cry for those who died, and to also remember the history behind my name. Martyan Baranov, 9th grade.

I dont think we would have won the war if it had happened now. Nowadays people are less united and think mostly about themselves. Today, if one sees a fight, he records it on his mobile instead of trying to stop it. The May 9 celebration affects everybody, as our lives today depended on that victory. Its victory unites people. It is a day of sorrow and happiness. Alexander Akimov, 7th grade.

This celebration is so important and significant in Russia because the war hurt every family, it affected every household. Gleb Schennikov, 9th grade.

For me, Victory Day is a reason to say thank you to all those who fought in the war and to think about my own life; to see how good everything is in my life and to appreciate it. I have a home, family and food these are the most important things one needs in life. Back during the tragic war years, not everybody had these three basic things. Listening to stories, reading articles and watching films about the war makes me think and want to do something useful for society. I dont want to live without a purpose, but instead do something wonderful. Liza Vedeneeva, 10th grade.

It was Russia that had the strongest resistance against Germany and it was Russia that suffered the largest loss. Most European countries did not resist or defend in the way that Russia did back then. The most severe battles, where thousands of people died, were in Russia. May 9 is an important day for us, as we honor the memory of the grandfathers and great-grandfathers who died in the war. Natalia Komarova, 9th grade.

I want to say thank you, that together with other people, you defended our Fatherland. Even in the harshest cold, you stayed on the battlefields and did not surrender. Thank you because we have never known what war is. In your eyes, you had the fire of hope while you ignored the fear that tried to take your heart. You did everything to give life to your children, grandsons and great-grandsons. War is a time of sorrow, death and fear. You went into battle with the hope and faith that you can change everything. I am sorry people of our generation continue to fight and bring harm to each other. We need to stop fighting; otherwise nothing will be left in our world. I believe that one day I will wake up on an earth, where murder is just a word, so that your efforts will not have been in vain. Dmitry Kabanov, 7th grade (part of a letter written to his great-grand father Vasily)





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Aug. 29


Park Pobedy will feature the sights and sounds of the world outside of Russia during the Open Art International Festival today. Taste foreign cuisine, learn how to make tea like the Chinese or relax in a hammock during the free event. Although entrance is free, you must register beforehand if you wish to attend.



Saturday, Aug. 30


Break out the tweed and channel your inner Englishman during the English Hunt Picnic this afternoon organized by the Bagmut stables from Krasny Bor in the Leningrad Oblast. Equestrian stunts, English archery and classic hunting fashion will all be available to visitors hoping to live like the characters in Downton Abbey if only for a day. Tickets for the event cost 7,900 rubles ($219.40).


Bookworms will have their chance to swap out well-read classics for something new for their bookshelves at Knigovorot, a free book exchange that will be held in the Yusupov Garden on Sadovaya Ulitsa today. Come for the chance to get a new book or take the opportunity to discuss the literary merits of your favorite authors with fellow fans.



Sunday, Aug. 31


The Neva Delta International Blues Festival wraps up this afternoon on Vasilevsky Island with a concert featuring not only some of Russias best blues bands but international stars as well. Admission is free for all three days of the festival, which begins on Aug. 29, and the shows starting at 5 p.m. each day.



Monday, Sept. 1


Today marks the beginning of Lermontov-Fest, a fall festival celebrating the life of one of Russias most remarkable poets who, in a fate eerily similar to Pushkins, was killed in a duel at the age of 26. Organized by the Lermontov Library System, the next several months will see art exhibitions, concerts and public lectures focusing on the Lermontovs short yet prolific career. Check the Lermontov Library Systems website for more details.



Tuesday, Sept. 2


Join expats and practice your Russian during the Russian Clubs weekly meetings every Tuesday night at 7:30 p.m. The club is free to participate in although you need to be a registered member of Couchsurfing.



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