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Students Discover the Importance of Victory Day

Published: May 7, 2014 (Issue # 1809)



  • Veterans of World War II and the Siege of Leningrad wave to crowds of spectators along Nevsky Prospekt (File).
    Photo: Alexander Belenky / SPT

As an assignment, a number of classes at St. Petersburg School 327 were asked to write about Victory Day, explaining why it is an important day to celebrate and what it means to them. Below includes just a small selection of some of the insightful and thoughtful words by these young students.

This is the day I remember my great-great-grandfather. His name was Martyan and I was named in honor of him. I dont know a lot about him, but I am very proud that I have his name. For me, May 9 is a great day that makes me cry for those who died, and to also remember the history behind my name. Martyan Baranov, 9th grade.

I dont think we would have won the war if it had happened now. Nowadays people are less united and think mostly about themselves. Today, if one sees a fight, he records it on his mobile instead of trying to stop it. The May 9 celebration affects everybody, as our lives today depended on that victory. Its victory unites people. It is a day of sorrow and happiness. Alexander Akimov, 7th grade.

This celebration is so important and significant in Russia because the war hurt every family, it affected every household. Gleb Schennikov, 9th grade.

For me, Victory Day is a reason to say thank you to all those who fought in the war and to think about my own life; to see how good everything is in my life and to appreciate it. I have a home, family and food these are the most important things one needs in life. Back during the tragic war years, not everybody had these three basic things. Listening to stories, reading articles and watching films about the war makes me think and want to do something useful for society. I dont want to live without a purpose, but instead do something wonderful. Liza Vedeneeva, 10th grade.

It was Russia that had the strongest resistance against Germany and it was Russia that suffered the largest loss. Most European countries did not resist or defend in the way that Russia did back then. The most severe battles, where thousands of people died, were in Russia. May 9 is an important day for us, as we honor the memory of the grandfathers and great-grandfathers who died in the war. Natalia Komarova, 9th grade.

I want to say thank you, that together with other people, you defended our Fatherland. Even in the harshest cold, you stayed on the battlefields and did not surrender. Thank you because we have never known what war is. In your eyes, you had the fire of hope while you ignored the fear that tried to take your heart. You did everything to give life to your children, grandsons and great-grandsons. War is a time of sorrow, death and fear. You went into battle with the hope and faith that you can change everything. I am sorry people of our generation continue to fight and bring harm to each other. We need to stop fighting; otherwise nothing will be left in our world. I believe that one day I will wake up on an earth, where murder is just a word, so that your efforts will not have been in vain. Dmitry Kabanov, 7th grade (part of a letter written to his great-grand father Vasily)





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Aug. 1


Bikers from all around the world will gather to take part in a parade, extreme shows and rock concerts during the International Biker Festival that revs its engines today and runs through Aug. 3 near Olgino Hotel, 4/2 Primorskogo Shosse.


The Peter and Paul Fortress will be turned into an open-air cinema today and tomorrow as part of the 5th International Short and Animation Film Festival. A huge screen across the fortress walls will air short films non-stop with board games, photo sessions and other activities also on offer for visitors. For more information, visit www.opencinemafest.ru



Saturday, Aug. 2


Gatchina Palace Park Museum will host its second annual Night of Light, an impressive audio-visual show across the night sky. Tickets are 600 rubles ($16).


If graphic design is more your thing then check out Illustration Day, where you will be able to visit an exhibition, attend lectures by professionals and even show experts some of your own work. The event starts at noon at Zona Deystvia, 73 Ligovsky Prospekt. The entrance fee is 350 rubles ($10).



Sunday, Aug. 3


History lovers shouldnt miss the chance to see reenactments of World War I battles in Pushkin at noon. Besides exciting war scenes, visitors can enjoy live music, historical costumes, an equestrian show and a fancy-dress parade starting from the Moscow gates.


Garage Sale, the popular and growing flea market where nothing is priced over 500 rubles ($14.11), starts today at noon in Loft-Project Etagi, 74 Ligovsky Prospekt. Be sure to get in early to score a bargain. Entry costs 50 rubles ($1.40)



Monday, Aug. 4


Continue the working week with a calm and steady mind with a free yoga lesson at 7 p.m. in the Bukvoyed store at 23A Vladimirsky Prospekt.



Tuesday, Aug. 5


Visit The Romanov Dynasty doll exhibition today, where more than fifty porcelain dolls depicting Russian rulers, and made by Olina Ventzel, will be on show. The exhibition continues through Aug. 31 in Sheremetyev Palace, 34 Fontanka Naberezhnaya.



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