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Promoting Propaganda

Published: May 14, 2014 (Issue # 1810)



Photo: Bigarthouse.ru

(Victory Day) used tobe my favorite Russian holiday. I would always tear up when I saw theveterans, covered fromneck towaist inmedals andribbons, marching proudly across Red Square. Andfor afew years, when we were all friends, I liked watching theother Allied veterans march along with their former Soviet comrades-in-arms.

This year, with another war raging, thefighter jets buzzing my apartment house during rehearsals forthe air show seem creepy, not cool. Andthe drumbeat of (propaganda) is like nothing I have ever seen or heard before.

Andso I find myself thinking constantly about aword I thought I could put onthe dusty top shelf ofmy mind andforget. came toRussian fromthe Latin propaganda, defined as (that which is tobe disseminated). Theword appeared inthe 17th-century Catholic Church, which founded agroup topropagate thefaith tothe unenlightened andunfaithful.

Andthat is pretty much what still does only thefaith changes over time andplace.

Most ofthe time, theword has anegative connotation inRussian. Infact, ina dictionary ofpolitical terminology, theword is defined inpart like this: (Propaganda was theterm used todescribe attempts bytotalitarian regimes tocompletely subordinate science andany other knowledge tothe interests ofstate policy).

So you find usage like this: , - (Thanks tothe ham-fisted propaganda, people were certain that they could only get thetruth fromthe radio voices [of America, etc.]).

But not all theways andmeans of and (to propagandize) are bad: , , . (A doctor should promote ahealthy lifestyle, ofcourse andby example, too).

and can also be used forthe promotion ofcommercial endeavors or products: , (He did everything he could topromote theMoscow Virtuosi).

Now this is usually (promotion), done bythe noun (promoter) through theverb (to promote).

Question: ? (How do you promote anintellectual book?) Answer: Byusing anative Russian verb like (to advance, promote).

(I will promote your book insocial media). This kind of (promotion) seems tobe more covert than, say, (to advertise) or (carry out anad campaign).

Andall ofit comes under thebig umbrella of (marketing), which can be (commercial), (social) or political: (Political marketing inRussia is programming theelectorates behavior).

Andwe know how you do that: . Here we go again.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, Oct. 1


The St. Petersburg International Innovation Forum 2014 kicks off today at Lenexpo, where it will be presenting the latest and greatest ideas until Oct. 3. Focusing on economic development and the decisions and measures necessary to encourage development in Russias most important industries, the event is a possibility to discuss the innovations currently available in a variety of fields.


Representatives of the Russian and international media industries arrive in St. Petersburg for the first ever International Media Forum being hosted by the city until Oct. 10. With a variety of events on tap, including workshops, lectures and film screenings, the event plans to reemphasize the citys reputation as the countrys culture capital and as an emerging market and location for the visual arts.



Thursday, Oct. 2


The celebration of the bicentennial of the birth of Mikhail Lermontov continues with todays free exhibition in the citys Lermontov Library at 19 Liteiny Prospekt. Titled Under the Rustling Wings, the temporary exhibition will feature the costumes and scenery used in the 1917 production of Lermontovs play The Masquerade, which he wrote in 1835 when he was only 21 years old.



Friday, Oct. 3


Learn more about how to manage and evaluate employee performance during SPIBAs Human Resources Committee meeting this morning on Employee Assessment: Global and Local Trends. Starting at 9:30 a.m., the discussion will touch on such topics as the partnership between HR and business, reliable assessment strategies and more, with Tatiana Andrianova, the head of the SHL Russia and CIS branch in St. Petersburg, as the featured guest. Confirm your participation by Oct. 2 by emailing office@spiba.ru or calling 325 9091.


AmChams Procurement Committee Meeting is at 9 a.m. this morning in their office in the New St. Isaac Office Center on Ulitsa Yakubovicha.



Saturday, Oct. 4


Wine and cheese lovers will get their chance to revel during Scandinavia Country Club and Spas Wine Market Weekend. Going on today and tomorrow, wining diners can listen to live music, take part in culinary classes and, of course, sample a variety of fine wines from around the world. The cost of admission is 400 rubles ($10.30) for adults and 200 rubles ($5.15) for children.



Sunday, Oct. 5


Look for the latest fall fashions at the Autumn Market today in Freedom Anticafe at 7 Kazanskaya Ulitsa. The minimarket plans to offer clothes more flattering than the puffy jackets that are a staple of the citys cold-weather fashion, while offering the same amount of protection from the biting winds blowing off of the Baltic.



Monday, Oct. 6


SKA St. Petersburg, the citys KHL affiliate, welcomes Slovakian club HC Slovan in a match-up tonight at the Ice Palace near the Prospekt Bolshevikov metro station. The puck drops at 7:30 p.m. and tickets can be purchased on the clubs website or in person at either the arenas box office or the clubs merchandise store on Nevsky Prospekt.



Tuesday, Oct. 7


Learn more about Russias energy industry at the St. Petersburg Energy Forum that begins today and runs through Oct. 10. Attracting industry experts and political and business representatives, the forum plans to welcome more than 350 plus companies and their representatives to discuss the future of Russias largest economic sector.



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