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Activist Stabbed on Nevsky

Published: May 22, 2014 (Issue # 1811)



  • Local protester Miroslav Romanov was attacked while demonstrating with this placard on Sunday.
    Photo: Solidarity

A Russian nationalist who was allegedly on his way to join pro-Russian insurgents in eastern Ukraine stabbed a pro-Crimean Tatar protester on Nevsky Prospekt Sunday.

Activist Miroslav Romanov, who took part in a series of one-man protests to mark the 70th anniversary of the Soviet deportations of Crimean Tatars, was attacked at around 4 p.m. while standing with a placard that read We demand a recognition of Stalins deportation of these people as a crime, and its organizers and participants as war criminals.

Speaking to The St. Petersburg Times on Monday, Romanov said that the attacker did not utter a word as he attacked the placard with a knife, injuring Romanov in the process.

Before that he started to quarrel [with other demonstrators], threatening to bring the boys, and then he came up to me, stabbed me and walked away, Romanov said.

He cut through the placard and the knife slipped and cut my shirt, the left part of my stomach and my bag. Actually, the bag is what saved me. He used all his power, downward, with his right arm.

Despite receiving a flesh wound, Romanov refused to be hospitalized when an ambulance arrived 15 minutes later to give first aid.

According to Romanov, the attacker was detained by Solidarity co-chairman Konstantin Yershov and police officers who were nearby. They acted promptly; its lucky that the police were around, otherwise he would have fled, said Romanov.

The accused attacker is Ruslan Pseush, a resident of Yelizavetino in the Gatchinsky District of the Leningrad Oblast.

A further police search revealed that Pseush was carrying several knives. According to Romanov, Pseush denied attacking him at first, but later started bragging and posing as a hero, he said.

An inquiry officer told Romanov that Pseuch would be kept in custody for the time being, he added.

According to Yershov, Pseush, while detained at the police station, insisted that he had the right to object to the protests on Nevsky Prospekt. He didnt deny that he was swinging with a knife. Instead he insisted that he was aiming for the placard only, with no intention to inflict bodily harm unto anyone, Yershov told The St. Petersburg Times on Monday.

In his blog on Russian social network VKontakte, Pseuch had posted anti-Ukrainian remarks and urged people to go to Ukraine to join pro-Russian insurgents. His most recent postings suggest that he was planning to go to Ukraines unstable areas himself.

Everythings great. I am leaving for the south. The ticket is in my pocket, he wrote on May 16. At 11:36 a.m. on Sunday, the day of the attack, he wrote, I am off... Good luck to everyone!

Pseuchs profile page also heavily features photos of him posing in army uniform with weapons and knives, while several photos showed him giving a Nazi salute. His friends on the social network include Alexander Barkashov, the leader of the neo-Nazi movement Russian National Unity (RNE), which is believed to be assisting in transporting Russian militants to southeastern Ukraine.

When Pseuch was detained after the attack, he had a train ticket to Rostov-on-Don, the largest nearest Russian city to the Ukrainian border, Solidarity activists said.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Aug. 22


Get ready to pledge allegiance to the flag during National Flag Day, paying tribute to when, 23 years ago today, the iconic hammer-and-sickle was replaced with the tricolor that now flutters in the wind. Petersburgers will be treated to a free concert on Palace Square, a military parade and a culminating air show featuring Russias Russian Knights stunt pilots.



Saturday, Aug. 23


Uppsala Park plays host to Fairy Noon today, a performance of five separate fairy tales ranging from folk classics to more haunting selections. There will be three different renditions of the tales throughout the day and tickets start at 500 rubles ($13.80) for adults and 300 rubles ($8.30) for children.


Classic Finnish cartoon characters the Moomins expect to receive a warm welcome from Russian fans during todays Moomin Festival at the Pearl Plaza Shopping Center at 51 Petergofskoye Shosse. Become a kid again or introduce a new generation to the beloved creation of Finnish writer Tove Jansson.



Sunday, Aug. 24


The tortured genius of Dutch master Vincent van Gogh gets his day in the centers Konnushnaya Ploschad during Make Art Like Van Gogh, a daylong celebration of the artist that will allow amateur artists to try and replicate the work that made the famed painter world-renowned.


Experience a variety of dances highlighting the diversity of the world around as at the final day of the Ethno-Dance International Dance Festival that has been at the St. Petersburg Humanitarian University of Trade Unions this past week. Tonights performance will feature Egyptian dancers accompanied by local orchestras.



Monday, Aug. 25


Today kicks off the Elena Obraztsovoy International Competition for Young Vocalists in the large hall of the Shostakovich Philharmonic. Talented youngsters will showcase their range over the next six days before a winner is chosen on Aug. 30.



Tuesday, Aug. 26


Love movies but hate all those words? Then check out Rodina Cinema Centers Factor of Consensus film forum this evening. Silent movie classics from the beginning of the 20th century will be screened and accompanied by a pianist, who will provide the soundtrack for the ongoing action. The screenings begin at 7 p.m. Check Rodinas website for more details.



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