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State-Run Kids Channel to Show Only Russian-Made Cartoons

Published: June 2, 2014 (Issue # 1813)



  • The hugely popular Russian animated version of A. A. Milne's Winnie-the-Pooh.
    Photo: Wikimedia Commons

A state-owned television holding answered the calls of the country's leadership on Sunday by launching Mult, a new channel for children that will show only Russian-made cartoons, Vedomosti reported.

The All-Russia State Television and Radio Broadcasting holding company already co-owns the Carousel children's television channel, which is aimed at children younger than 14, but about half of its cartoons and films are foreign-made.

Politicians have been pushing for Russian children's exposure to foreign-made cartoons to be reduced for some time, and anti-Western sentiment has become louder since the U.S. and EU imposed sanctions on top Russian officials and lawmakers after Russia annexed Crimea from Ukraine in March.

According to a recent survey ordered by the holding, most Russians back the idea of having a channel showing only domestically produced cartoons, its general director Tatyana Tsyvareva told Vedomosti on Thursday.

"It's important to protect and pass on the national cultural code to children," she said.

At a meeting of the government council for cinematography in March, Culture Minister Vladimir Medinsky said that quotas need to be brought in to make sure that Russian animated programs are guaranteed a certain amount of airtime — for both spiritual and financial reasons.

But Medinsky then lamented that a lot of money is spent on producing Russian cartoons that channels are ultimately unwilling to broadcast, and added that children were missing out on important lessons as a result: "In Russia we need national heroes; it is important to show children what is good and what is bad," he said.

At a Cabinet meeting in April, Medinsky appeared to have overcome his worries about quality, proposing to rebrand Carousel as a channel showing only Russian and Soviet cartoons — an idea supported by President Vladimir Putin. But Mult will fill the void itself.

"We are choosing not only the best, but also the sweetest Russian cartoons for our channel," Tsyvareva said.

Mult, which is short for Multfilm, or "cartoon" in Russian, will be on air round-the-clock, with no advertisements, and will be included on the packages of the country's main cable television providers.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Oct. 24


SPIBA’s ongoing “Breakfast with the Director” series continues today, featuring Tomas Hajek, Managing Director of the Northwest Division at Danone Russia. Hajek will be discussing collaborations between businesses from different cultures. The meeting is at 9 a.m. at the Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel and all who wish to attend must confirm their participation by Oct. 23.


Get your gong on at “Sounds of the Universe,” a concert at the city planetarium this evening incorporating six different gongs to create relaxing songs that will transport you upwards into the stratosphere. Tickets are 700 rubles ($17).



Saturday, Oct. 25


AVA Expo, the eighth edition of the event revolving around all things pop culture, returns to Lenexpo this weekend. Geeks, nerds, dweebs and dorks will have their chance to talk science fiction and explore a variety of international pop culture. Tickets for the event can be purchased on their website at avaexpo.ru.



Sunday, Oct. 26


Zenit St. Petersburg returns home for the first time in nearly a month as they host Mordovia Saransk in a Russian Premier League game. Currently at the top of the league thanks to their undefeated start to the season, the northern club hopes to extend the gap between them and second-place CSKA Moscow and win the title for the first time in three years. Tickets are available at the stadium box office or on the club’s website.



Monday, Oct. 27


Today marks the end of the art exhibit “Neophobia” at the Erarta Museum. Artists Alexey Semichov and Andrei Kuzmin took a neo-modernist approach to represent the array of fears that are ever-present throughout our lives. Tickets are 200 rubles ($4.90).



Tuesday, Oct. 28


The Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel plays host to SPIBA’s Marketing and Communications Committee’s round table discussion on “Government Relations Practices in Russia” this morning. The discussion starts at 9:30 a.m. and participation must be confirmed by Oct. 24.



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