Saturday, October 25, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS Download APP
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

19th Century Portraits

History of St. Petersburg Museum: Rumyantsev Mansion

 

  Print this article Print this article

Russians Passing the Buck on Charities

Published: June 4, 2014 (Issue # 1814)



  • Russia was ranked 123rd out of 153 countries by the Charities Aid Foundations Giving Index.
    Photo: Igor Tabakov / Fotoimedia

I have around 430 friends on Facebook, and plenty of them respond with like and so forth to the vacation photos or the article links that I post from time to time.

But in early May I used Facebook for something much more important than holiday snaps. I wrote a post to draw attention to the plight of Valeria Olshanskaya, a woman who has spent decades working for a charity raising funds to help hearing-impaired children. Valeria is battling cancer and now needs financial help herself.

Valerias main fundraiser is her daughter, Varvara, who is deaf. And young Varvara, seeing her mothers desperate situation, has started using the Internet to appeal for donations.

When I drew attention to their situation on Facebook, my 430 friends, mostly Russians, responded with what I can only describe as a deafening silence. In fact the only person who reacted at all was an American. I was deeply grateful to her but felt deflated and a bit let down.

Two weeks later, I remembered that disappointment as I listened to a speech about charity at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum.

Andrei Dubovskov, president and chairman of the board at MTS, a major Russian provider of mobile-phone services, was expressing his own frustration over the poor response from the companys 70 million subscribers when it makes charity appeals. He said fewer than 0.1 percent of customers ever participate in charitable projects introduced or supported by MTS.

As the intervention of social networks into our lives has increased dramatically, Dubovskov said, the avalanche of desperate, unsolicited appeals has come to seem to many people like an attack.

As with any attack, people tend to defend to protect themselves from what they see as having to deal with sorrow. Dubovskovs words brought to mind the reaction of a friend, who some time ago received the news that a couple she knew were going through a tragedy. Their daughter had been diagnosed with cancer. Her condition was rapidly getting worse and the outlook was bleak. The girl soon died.

My friend admitted that on first hearing of the situation she had abruptly cut off contact with the family.

I was in no position to help, and I couldnt face either the girl, who was just vanishing, or talking to her parents, she said, trying to explain.

At the Economic Forum, Russians limp response to charitable appeals was also taken up by Maria Chertok, director of the Russian office of the Charities Aid Foundation (CAF). She said the organizations 2013 World Giving Index showed that a mere 6 percent of Russians donated money to a charitable cause even in a way as simple as giving a bit of change to street beggars.

Pages: [1] [2 ] [3]






 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Saturday, Oct. 25


AVA Expo, the eighth edition of the event revolving around all things pop, returns to Lenexpo this weekend. Geeks, nerds, dweebs and dorks will have their chance to talk science fiction and explore a variety of international pop culture. Tickets for the event can be purchased on their website at avaexpo.ru.



Sunday, Oct. 26


Zenit St. Petersburg returns home for the first time in nearly a month as they host Mordovia Saransk in a Russian Premier League game. Currently at the top of the league thanks to their undefeated start to the season, the northern club hopes to extend the gap between them and second-place CSKA Moscow and win the title for the first time in three years. Tickets are available at the stadium box office or on the clubs website.



Monday, Oct. 27


Today marks the end of the art exhibit Neophobia at the Erarta Museum. Artists Alexey Semichov and Andrei Kuzmin took a neo-modernist approach to represent the array of fears that are ever-present throughout our lives. Tickets are 200 rubles ($4.90).



Tuesday, Oct. 28


The Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel plays host to SPIBAs Marketing and Communications Committees round table discussion on Government Relations Practices in Russia this morning. The discussion starts at 9:30 a.m. and participation must be confirmed by Oct. 24.



Times Talk