Sunday, October 26, 2014
 
Follow sptimesonline on Facebook Follow sptimesonline on Twitter Follow sptimesonline on RSS Download APP
MOST READ



PARTNER NEWS



BLOGS



OPINION



WHERE TO GO?

19th Century Portraits

History of St. Petersburg Museum: Rumyantsev Mansion

 

Перевести на русский Перевести на русский Print this article Print this article

Alcohol Sales Banned Citywide on June 20 for School Holiday

Published: June 19, 2014 (Issue # 1816)



  • The official Aliye Parusa program ends with a fireworks display over the Neva River.
    Photo: VK.com

Vice Governor of St. Petersburg Vasily Kichedzhi announced June 18 that alcohol sales will be banned throughout the city for 24 hours staring the morning of June 20, as the city’s recent school graduates prepare to celebrate the Aliye Parusa, or Scarlet Sails, holiday.

Aliye Parusa is the largest celebration of the city’s White Nights Festival and dates back to 1968. Based on a popular children's book from 1922 by Alexander Grin, the holiday was banned by the city government from 1979 to 2005, when it was reinstated as an official city holiday. St. Petersburg is the only Russian city to celebrate graduation day on such a large scale.

Traditionally, the holiday sees tens of thousands of high-school graduates dressed to the nines descend on the city center for an all-night party on Palace Square and the surrounding areas. Over the years, the under-age drinking associated with Aliye Parusa has come in for regular criticism from the media and parents.

Speaking about the alcohol ban, Kichedzhi said, "those who want to find alcohol probably will, but we are taking strict precautions to make it much more difficult.” The vice governor also said that there was no legal basis for the ban but rather that it is the result of conversations with business owners, who Kichedzhi said were amenable.

The municipal government is reported to be contributing 17 million rubles ($493,841) toward the event, which will feature concerts, a water show and fireworks. The chairman of the city’s mass-media committee Alexander Lobkov said that the city will spend 6.6 million rubles ($191,713) on decorations and 15.88 million rubles ($458,982) on entertainment for the event. Rossiya bank will make up the shortfall.

Concerts to which only the Class of 2014 will be admitted will begin at 11 p.m. on Palace Square and the spit of Vasilevsky Island followed by a multimedia water show with fireworks on the Neva at 1:40 a.m. The concerts and water show will be broadcast live across the country.

According to Kichedzhi, 33,000 graduates are expected to attend the event, including about 200 graduates from Crimea who are expected to attend the event.

3,000 police officers will be deployed in the city center for the event and 30 police boats will patrol the waters to provide security for the event. Traffic along Nevsky Prospect, the city’s main thoroughfare, will be restricted between the Moika River and Palace Square from 6.30 p.m. on the June 20 until the following morning. Drivers are advised to seek alternate routes. The entire St. Petersburg metro system will remain open throughout the night.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Sunday, Oct. 26


Zenit St. Petersburg returns home for the first time in nearly a month as they host Mordovia Saransk in a Russian Premier League game. Currently at the top of the league thanks to their undefeated start to the season, the northern club hopes to extend the gap between them and second-place CSKA Moscow and win the title for the first time in three years. Tickets are available at the stadium box office or on the club’s website.



Monday, Oct. 27


Today marks the end of the art exhibit “Neophobia” at the Erarta Museum. Artists Alexey Semichov and Andrei Kuzmin took a neo-modernist approach to represent the array of fears that are ever-present throughout our lives. Tickets are 200 rubles ($4.90).



Tuesday, Oct. 28


The Domina Prestige St. Petersburg hotel plays host to SPIBA’s Marketing and Communications Committee’s round table discussion on “Government Relations Practices in Russia” this morning. The discussion starts at 9:30 a.m. and participation must be confirmed by Oct. 24.



Times Talk