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Ministry Says Harsher Sanctions Would Cost Russia 0.3% of GDP

Published: July 12, 2014 (Issue # 1819)



  • Russian economic growth has been sputtering since 2012 and the country entered technical recession in the first half of 2014, according to HSBC.
    Photo: Maxim Stulov / Vedomosti

An upsurge in international tensions and further sanctions slapped on sectors of the Russian economy over the country's annexation of Crimea from Ukraine would cost Russia 0.2 to 0.3 percent of the GDP this year, according to Russia's Finance Ministry.

But longer-term implications could be broader, crippling the country's much-needed modernization drive and hampering Russia's ability to emerge from an sharp economic slowdown, the ministry said Thursday a budgetary policy outline for 2015-2017 published on its website.

In the international furore that followed Russia's land grab in March, the European Union blacklisted about 60 Russian top officials, businessmen and companies, while the U.S. sanctioned some 50 names, banned cooperation in the nuclear and space industries and restricted the sale of hi-tech products to Russia.

Broader sanctions against whole sectors of the Russian economy, including its main staple, oil and gas, have been threatened, but not implemented. Skeptics said such sanctions would backfire against the EU, Russia's leading trade partner which is also heavily reliant on Russian petroleum exports. The ministry's forecast assumes no "sectoral" sanctions will be imposed.

Broad damage has been done, however — the spike in uncertainty has sent the perceived risks of operating in Russia skyrocketing, leading Western banks to shy away from the country, while many companies not already tied into Russia have put investment plans on hold. The value of syndicated loans granted to Russian commodities producers plummeted by 82 percent to $3.5 billion in the first half of this year, Bloomberg reported this week.

Russian economic growth has been sputtering since 2012, and the country entered technical recession in the first half of 2014, according to HSBC, though official statistics indicated GDP growth of 1.1 percent between January and May.





 


ALL ABOUT TOWN

Friday, Aug. 29


Park Pobedy will feature the sights and sounds of the world outside of Russia during the Open Art International Festival today. Taste foreign cuisine, learn how to make tea like the Chinese or relax in a hammock during the free event. Although entrance is free, you must register beforehand if you wish to attend.



Saturday, Aug. 30


Break out the tweed and channel your inner Englishman during the English Hunt Picnic this afternoon organized by the Bagmut stables from Krasny Bor in the Leningrad Oblast. Equestrian stunts, English archery and classic hunting fashion will all be available to visitors hoping to live like the characters in “Downton Abbey” if only for a day. Tickets for the event cost 7,900 rubles ($219.40).


Bookworms will have their chance to swap out well-read classics for something new for their bookshelves at Knigovorot, a free book exchange that will be held in the Yusupov Garden on Sadovaya Ulitsa today. Come for the chance to get a new book or take the opportunity to discuss the literary merits of your favorite authors with fellow fans.



Sunday, Aug. 31


The Neva Delta International Blues Festival wraps up this afternoon on Vasilevsky Island with a concert featuring not only some of Russia’s best blues bands but international stars as well. Admission is free for all three days of the festival, which begins on Aug. 29, and the shows starting at 5 p.m. each day.



Monday, Sept. 1


Today marks the beginning of Lermontov-Fest, a fall festival celebrating the life of one of Russia’s most remarkable poets who, in a fate eerily similar to Pushkin’s, was killed in a duel at the age of 26. Organized by the Lermontov Library System, the next several months will see art exhibitions, concerts and public lectures focusing on the Lermontov’s short yet prolific career. Check the Lermontov Library System’s website for more details.



Tuesday, Sept. 2


Join expats and practice your Russian during the Russian Club’s weekly meetings every Tuesday night at 7:30 p.m. The club is free to participate in although you need to be a registered member of Couchsurfing.



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