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In Fear of Sanctions, Russia's Central Bank Raises Key Interest Rate

Published: July 26, 2014 (Issue # 1821)



  • Russia's Central Bank raised its key interest rate to 8% on Friday.
    Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Russia's Central Bank on Friday unexpectedly raised its key borrowing rate for a third time this year in expectation of heightened international economic sanctions against Russia over the unrelenting crisis in Ukraine.

Russia's main financial regulator increased the key rate from 7.5 to 8 percent, saying that even in the present situation of slowing economic growth, quelling inflation is its main priority.

The decision comes as Russia is embroiled in the worst political standoff it has seen with the West since the end of the Cold War. The downing of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 in conflict-torn eastern Ukraine on July 17, which led to the deaths of all 298 people on board, has prompted the United States and European Union to consider more wide-ranging sanctions against Russia unless the government cooperates on de-escalating the conflict.

"Inflation risks have risen, connected, among other things, with the increased political tension and with its possible impact on the dynamics of the national currency rate, as well as with the changes in tax and tariff policies that are being discussed," the Central Bank said in a statement on its website.

"This decision is both unexpected and controversial," Alexander Morozov, chief economist for Russia and the CIS at HSBC, told The St. Petersburg Times.

EU ambassadors on Friday reached a preliminary decision to move ahead with economic sanctions, with likely measures to include closing off EU capital markets to state-owned banks and halting future arms sales to Russia, Reuters reported.

According to Morozov, raising the key interest rate was a drastic response to the phantom risk of sanctions, whose content and possible effects cannot yet be known.

"The Central Bank still had other means to deal with inflation, such as making its control of the banks more efficient," he said.

The Central Bank has already increased its key rate from 5.5 to 7 and then to 7.5 percent this year in an attempt to counter the impact that the depreciating ruble has had on the price of imports. The ruble fell 10 percent against the dollar and euro in the early months of this year but has since recovered some ground, hovering around 35.15 to the dollar and 47.18 to the euro on Friday evening.

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ALL ABOUT TOWN

Wednesday, Sept. 24


AmChams Human Resources Committee meets this morning to discuss Labor Market Trends in their office in the New St. Isaac Office Center on Ulitsa Yakubovicha. The meeting begins at 9 a.m.



Thursday, Sept. 25


Learn more about tax controls on prices at AmChams Taxation Committee Round Table Meeting this morning at 9 a.m. Vladimir I Golishevsky, Acting Head of the Transfer Pricing Department of the Federal Tax Service of Russia, will be in attendance to discuss amendments to the Russian Tax Code. Register in advance if you wish to attend by emailing all@spb.amcham.ru.


Today is the last day to check out Inventing Everyday Life. Part III: Street exhibition one of Manifestas parallel programs on at 36 Morisa Toreza Prospekt until 8 p.m.



Friday, Sept. 26


Feel yourself Spanish for a little bit at Spain Day, a celebration of all things Iberian this evening at the Derzhavin Mansion in the city center. Speak Spanish during the open classes, practice your footwork on the dance floor to the sounds of flamenco music or chow down on paella while learning more about the countrys culture.



Saturday, Sept. 27


Local KHL team SKA St. Petersburg welcomes Vityaz from the Moscow region this afternoon at 5 p.m. in a Western Conference showdown. Tickets are still available to the match and can be purchased on the teams website, at the arena or in their merchandise shop on Nevsky Prospekt.


Let Biblioteka restaurant on Nevsky Prospekt teach your children how to be proper gentlemen and ladies during Etiquette for Children, a class for children five to 11 years of age that promises to help them become the cream of society. The class starts at 5 p.m. and costs 600 rubles ($15.60). Call 322 2526 to reserve a spot for your child.



Sunday, Sept. 28


For something different, head to the African Pride Event being held by Nicks Walkabout Tours, who have also helped bring African tribal leaders for the celebration. Check Vkontakte for more information.



Monday, Sept. 29


Experience Baltic culture through the medium of drama during the Baltic House Theater Festival, which starts on Sept. 25 and continues through Oct. 13. Not only are some of the regions most famous dramatic works planned for production but the event acts as a creative laboratory for a future generation of dramatists. Check the events website for more details about the festival.



Tuesday, Sept. 30


Local neo-pagans invite all worshipers to the dedication of a new Heart Tree in Sosnovka Park, Gods Wood. 4 p.m.


The second MIFIC Expo begins today at Lenexpo, providing an interactive platform for industry experts and manufacturers. Accessories, surfaces and interior decoration materials are just some of the things that will be available for perusal at the expo, which runs through Oct. 2.



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